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Tag: Pincher Creek Legion

PIncher Creek dart players Dennis and Diana Plaza, and Rick and Michelle Visser

Shootin’ for the bullseye

Pincher Creek Legion hosted the organization’s provincial senior mixed darts tournament, held Friday and Saturday.

The home club was represented by couples Dennis and Diana Plaza, at left, and Rick and Michelle Visser.

The foursome finished seventh in the 16-team tournament. A team from Fort Saskatchewan will represent Alberta at nationals.

 

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Purple circle with three raised haised hands

Pincher Creek Legion seeks board members

Pincher Creek Legion Branch 43 will be hosting its AGM on Dec. 10, where members will gather to elect new officers and install them into the executive committee. Up to 12 Legion members can be elected to fill positions on the executive board, and the branch hopes that a few younger members will step up and take on a role.

“We really are looking for some new blood, some new people, some new ideas, somebody that’s willing to give us some hours,” says Maggie Christians, branch president.

According to Maggie, many of the current members of the branch’s executive committee have been a part of the Legion for a long time now. With that being said, she claims that it has become difficult to come up with fresh ideas, and hopes newer faces can help mitigate the problem.

There are currently eight Legion members in an executive position, leaving four vacancies to fill. Members interested in joining the executive committee are expected to have been members in good standing for at least a year.

Positions such as president and vice-president are roles reserved for those who, on top of being a Legion member, have a year’s experience on the committee.

 

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Legion members can be nominated for any of the positions, whether vacant or not, provided they are in attendance at the AGM and meet the prerequisites.

While the meeting will focus largely on electing new members of the branch’s executive committee, there will also be briefings regarding where Legion funds were allocated in the last year, and what can be expected in the year to come.

Maggie encourages any member of the local Legion to come out, vote and listen in on the meeting, regardless of whether you have intentions of running for a position.

Those who are currently not affiliated with the branch who wish to become members can head over to www.pinchercreeklegion.com/home to join for a $50 annual fee. New members will not be able to vote in the upcoming election, but are welcome to attend the meeting.

 

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Legion’s poppy campaign supports local veterans

Each year, from the last Friday of October until Nov. 11, people across the country wear a poppy in honour of our nation’s veterans. The poppy serves as a reminder of the sacrifices made to protect the freedoms we enjoy today, ensuring we never forget.

To coincide with the lead-up to Remembrance Day, Legions nationwide conduct local poppy campaigns, a program carried out annually to raise money in support of veterans.

Campaign funds are held in trust at the branch level to support veterans and their families within the community. This support could come in many forms, including food, clothing, shelter, medical assistance and more.

“Any money raised from the poppy campaign goes towards supporting our local veterans, anything from hospital stay expenses, to medical equipment being put in their home, basically anything that they would require,” says Angie Moen, who chairs Pincher Creek’s poppy campaign.

According to Dick Burnham, Pincher Creek’s branch service officer, in the past year, the local Legion has assisted veterans with the installation of medical equipment, medical research programs for veterans and Veterans of the Caribbean in need.

Residents have certainly taken notice of the wonderful services provided by the Legion to local veterans. Pincher Creek businesses have traditional poppy boxes in their establishments, Legion volunteers set up poppy tables for donations and citizens have made individual contributions. It’s evident that this program is one that could not work without community support.

 

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“It’s very important to get this kind of support from the community because the funds are directly used in cases of need for veterans of the Canadian Armed Forces and the RCMP,” says Dick.

“The support has been amazing,” says Angie. “This is my first year doing this and I’m very proud of this community and the support they’ve provided.”

If you wish to donate to the Pincher Creek Legion’s poppy fund, you can send an e-Transfer to Poppy Fund or mail a cheque to Pincher Creek Legion Branch 43, PO Box 131, Pincher Creek, AB, T0K 1W0.

As a registered charity, the fund can issue tax-deductible receipts, upon request, for donations of $25 or more.

“The poppy fund comes to the nation’s attention in November — but you can donate, anytime, locally at your Legion branch to support veterans and remembrance in your community,” says Dick.

Veterans in need of financial assistance are encouraged to contact their local Legion today. You do not need to be a member to seek help. For veterans in Pincher Creek, call the branch at 403-627-4024.

 

Information for the Royal Canadian Legion Poppy Fund

 

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Veteran Norman Walker speaks from a podium

Books of Remembrance

Canada’s eight Books of Remembrance, recognizing those who have given their lives in military service to their country, are installed in the Memorial Chamber of the Peace Tower in our nation’s capital, Ottawa.

A page of each book is turned every day in a ceremony at 11 a.m. so that every name sees the light of day at least once a year.

The First World War Book of Remembrance, dedicated in 1942, contains 66,655 names from the Great War, once touted as the war to end all wars.

A total of 44,893 Canadians are commemorated in the Second World War Book of Remembrance, placed in 1957.

The 211-page Newfoundland Book of Remembrance contains the names of 2,363 war dead from 1914 to 1949, before the province joined Confederation.

The South African War/Nile Expedition Book of Remembrance contains 267 names of those who perished in what is known as the 1899-1902 Boer War, as well as a special section dedicated to the 16 killed during the 1884-85 Nile Expedition, the first overseas conflict that Canada participated in.

 

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The 516 names in the Korean War Book of Remembrance are accompanied by a page displaying the shields of 17 countries of the United Nations Forces.

Dedicated in 1993, the Merchant Navy Book of Remembrance memorializes 2,212 mariners lost during both World Wars. Merchant navy veterans did not get their medals and benefits until 1993, and their comrades killed at sea have no grave or marker.

The seventh Book of Remembrance is titled In the Service of Canada. Its first volume memorializes 1,912 Canadian Armed Forces members who have died while serving since 1947. Dedicated in 2005, it contains the names of the dead from the war in Afghanistan, as well as peacekeeping and NATO missions. A second volume now includes the names of 81 killed in action since 2015.

A total of 1,653 soldiers and sailors and Indigenous allies killed in Canada when the country was a colony of Great Britain are commemorated in the War of 1812 Book of Remembrance. As a 200th anniversary project, it was commissioned in 2012 and unveiled in 2019.

An important objective of the Books of Remembrance is to increase public awareness of those Canadians who have served in the cause of peace.

Let us never forget those who never got to enjoy the peace and freedom we enjoy every day.

 

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Front cover of Oct. 11, 2023, issue of Shootin' the Breeze newspaper featuring a photo of Banger Bingo

October 11, 2023 – Shootin’ the Breeze

Rock of Ages 2.0

It might not have been the musical but it was very close for a packed house Friday at the Pincher Creek Legion. Billed as “not your grandma’s bingo,” Banger Bingo didn’t disappoint with blaring flashback ’80s music from groups like AC/DC and Kiss, to an air guitar competition. That’s lead entertainer Shane-saw, who also doubled up as the bingo caller. Rock on!

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Pincher Creek Legion celebrates first National Legion Week

Pincher Creek’s Legion Branch 43 hosted a private dinner Sept. 17 in recognition of the first National Legion Week, which ran Sept. 17 to 23. The new weeklong acknowledgment is meant to bring attention to the work of Legions across Canada, which serve and support military and RCMP veterans, as well as the community itself.

Photos by William Cockerell

 

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Rear view of sergeant-at-arms Fred White saluting the Canadian and British flags.

Sergeant-at-arms Fred White salutes the Canadian and British flags during the singing of Canada’s national anthem.

Three men and two women do a can-can step wearing brightly-coloured striped socks.

Dave Johnson, left Beth Goff, Rev. Dave Goff, Rachel Welsh and Fred White dance in colourful knitted socks as part of a comedy bit conducted by an area comedian, who wishes to remain anonymous.

Head-table guests look to guest speaker Gary Mills at the podium.

Pincher Creek Legion president Maggie Christians, left, Coleman Legion president Gary Littlewood, Beth Goff and branch padre Rev. Dave Goff listen attentively as guest speaker Gary Mills passionately addresses those in attendance.

Lou Niven, a woman with a coral-coloured sweater, sits next to veteran Norman Walker who is wearing military medals on his chest.

Lou Niven and veteran Norm Walker enjoy the evening’s festivities.

 

 

Aerial view of the Cowley Lions Campground on the Castle River in southwestern Alberta

 

 

Young boy squeals with delight while riding a sheep

Local kids ridin’ into rodeo weekend

Local youths will put their best boot forward this weekend as they participate in various events, including the kids rodeo, mutton bustin’, wild ponies and more.

“They’re our future rodeo stars,” says Marie Everts, a member of the rodeo organizing committee.

“Having youth involved in the rodeo weekend is always an important aspect of the events in order to grow these future rodeo champions, stars, volunteers, participants and all of the other people that make the rodeo a success.”

The opportunities for the future rodeo stars begin Friday at 10 a.m. with the Kids Fun Rodeo, a free event for participants and spectators alike. 

The Kids Rodeo features a wide range of events, including keyhole races, barrel racing, pole bending, flag races, a boot race and, a favourite among spectators, the toilet paper race.

Anyone 18 and under is welcome to participate. Those interested must register in person at the rodeo grounds between 8:30 and 9:30 a.m. on the event day. A parent or guardian must be present to sign a waiver.

 

Pig roast at wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

The fun doesn’t stop there for kids, as local youths will compete in mutton bustin’ at noon on Sunday. Children aged three to six will be put to the test as they attempt to ride sheep in the rodeo arena.

Despite increasing the number of available sheep for this year’s rodeo by 10 compared to last year, all 30 sheep have a rider ready for the event.

Participants in the mutton bustin’ event must have a properly fitted helmet and be at the arena by 11:45 a.m. on Sunday.

Wild ponies will return once more as the followup to the bull riders on Saturday and Sunday. 

Following the event’s successful debut during last year’s rodeo, children aged nine to 14 will compete in teams of three to see who can mount and stay on a bucking pony the longest.

One team member acts as the anchor, holding the pony and trying to slow it down, another attempts to put their arms around the pony’s neck to hold it still, and the third is the rider.

 

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This year’s teams feature:

—Kash Lievers, Ridge Flundra and Lachlan Stauffer

—River Koster, Nash Lund and Acey Adair

—Stran Lievers, Cooper Plain Eagle and Jaydon Vold

—Jack Emerson, Casey Emerson, and Hayden Stav

—Angelina Morris, Morgan McNabb and Natalie Donahue

—Grady Dwyer, Rudy Barrios and Sierra Chartier

Teams will be ranked based on their average times scored on Saturday and Sunday, with prizes handed out to the team with the best average.

The calf scramble is also back thanks to the Pincher Creek Legion’s donation of four bikes for the event. The scrambles will occur during intermission, following the trick riders’ performances on Saturday and Sunday.

Kids aged seven to nine and 10 to 12 can chase after a calf with a ribbon tied around its tail, with the goal being to get the ribbon and bring it back to the announcer. The fastest youngster in each age group wins the race and a bike.

Preregistration is not required and children can head down to the calf scramble once it is announced at intermission. 

Lastly, there will be a sandpit, loads of kids games and much more. There’s something for children of all ages at this year’s rodeo!

 

Events poster for Pincher Creek Pro Rodeo

Giddy-up, there’s fun to be found all over town!

Rodeo weekend is jam-packed with activities that appeal to a wide range of interests and offer families and friends the chance to kick back, relax and have fun — and you don’t have to be a cowhand to enjoy it.

Pincher Creek’s volunteer organizations and businesses are coming together to offer delicious meals, one-of-a-kind buys and buzzing social events.

Love Local

This weekend provides the perfect opportunity to support local businesses, organizations and events.

We encourage our readers to take time to mosey around town to shop, eat and enjoy Pincher Creek’s small-town hospitality whether they are locals or visitors. 

In our Rodeo Week special feature you’ll find great deals on goods from steaks to western wear. Your support of the advertisers in this feature section is appreciated!

Pancake breakfasts and parade

Early risers can join Napi Friendship Association for a pancake breakfast from 9 to 11 on Friday and enjoy the warm summer sun from the picnic tables on the organization’s adjacent lawn. The breakfast, which includes pancakes, sausages, eggs, coffee and orange juice, is free of charge.

Breakfasting continues on Saturday, with a morning meal from 8 to 10 a.m. hosted by the Cowley Lions in the parking lot of the Pincher Creek Provincial Building. Attendees can enjoy $5 plates of pancakes and sausages, and meet Pincher Creek councillors, who plan to make an appearance at the event.

Proceeds go toward helping community members in need and supporting scholarships for students in the Lundbreck and Cowley area.

Sunday you can get your pancakes at the rodeo grounds from 8 to 11 a.m., hosted by the Pincher Creek SPCA. Breakfast is $5 and proceeds go toward veterinary care for the animals in the local shelter.

The Pincher Creek parade starts winding its way down Main Street at 11 a.m. on Saturday. Come wave at the colourful festive floats full of local businesspeople, volunteers, municipal leaders and cultural groups. For more information on this event, see the full story on page 17.

All the eats!

In keeping with tradition, Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village is hosting its annual Lunch With the Pioneers on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hungry parade-goers can enjoy a $15 meal of lasagna, Caesar salad and dessert, with additional treats like ice cream available to purchase. 

Museum admission is free all day.

The Pincher Creek Legion is selling burgers Saturday after the parade until 3 p.m., then again from 5 to 8, along with hosting special events. Friday evening at 5, you can grab a bite from the chuckwagon supper at the family-friendly Legion.

Stop by Fox Theatre on Saturday for breakfast sandwiches and coffee, footlong hotdogs and many other tasty treats on Parade day..

Youth lemonade stands

To cool down after the parade, visitors can quench their thirst by supporting a local stand this Lemonade Day. The town’s most ambitious youth entrepreneurs are whipping up their own inventive takes on this classic summer drink and serving them from hand-decorated booths around town.

Floral festival

An array of colourful and fragrant floral arrangements are on public display Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Den on Main Street. The Oldman Rose Society of Southern Alberta is organizing the event to showcase some of Pincher Creek’s best gardening talent and to provide useful planting tips.

Western Market 

Cowboys and gals can find everything to match their lifestyles at the Pincher Creek Western Market. Seventy-two vendors are setting up shop at Community Hall from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sunday, displaying a variety of goods including ceramics, art, jewelry, food, clothing and horse rack. 

The market is hosting musicians Lani Folkard and Lyndsay Butler on Saturday, and Boots and the Hoots, and Justin Sutton on Sunday. You can also find food, beverages and more at market vendors Celestial Sweets, Sun & Sip, and SGB Fitbodies.

Don’t miss the Ranchland Mall pop-up market, running from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and specials in local retail businesses.

Kids Rodeo

The kids rodeo starts at 10 a.m. Friday with entertainment and activities galore, as well as treats for purchase from Fox Theatre. Read more about the kids rodeo on page 6. 

Thanks to sponsorship from the Pincher Creek Legion, the calf scramble is back and four bikes are up for grabs at the weekend Pro Rodeo performances.

Mutton bustin’ is a delight for the youngest riders, who will take to the arena before the Sunday-afternoon rodeo. The wild pony races are great fun to watch and feature local kids who aren’t afraid to land in the dirt.

Speaking of dirt, the sand pile to the west of the stands is a handy way to keep the little ones busy when the rodeo action tires them out.

Fun around town

If you’re looking for a family night out before the rodeo kicks off, plan to catch Fred Penner’s show on Wednesday, Aug. 16.

This outdoor show is free for everyone. Sing along with Fred and listen to him spin tales that will delight all ages.

In preparation for rodeo weekend, businesses will be judged on their rodeo decor Thursday at 1 p.m. Be sure to take in the rodeo spirit of Pincher Creek these next few days!

If you’re at Ranchland Mall, check out the Co-op’s photo booth and get into the spirit of the West.

Meat draws start at 12:30 p.m. at the Legion. Not sure what a meat draw is? Stop in, enjoy the air conditioning and check it out!

Saturday night’s cabaret with live music by Brandon Lorenzo will be entertaining for the 18-plus crowd. Be sure to plan for a safe ride home.

Fuelling up on the grounds

One doesn’t need to leave the rodeo grounds to get cold treats and drinks, or a bite to eat!

The Rocky Mountain Gut Truck is providing barbecue fare during Thursday night’s team roping competition and will also be ready for a hungry crowd at the cabaret on Saturday night.

The 4-H concession is open from Friday to Sunday. Club members are happy to help cure the growl in your belly, offering community service with a smile.

Beer gardens on the ag grounds are open Thursday to Sunday. Hours vary, so check the header of each day’s rodeo page for specifics.

If sweet treats are what you desire on a hot day, don’t miss the Moose Lick truck, which will be on-site to keep things cool.

Foothills 4-H Beef Club members are also offering a special dinner on Saturday at 5:30. Tickets for a steak sandwich with two sides are $20 and sold on a first come, first served basis.

Remember to have cash on hand for your purchases!

Movie night

Spend a night under the stars with friends and family Friday at the Town of Pincher Creek’s latest outdoor movie night. Starting at 9:30 p.m., Madagascar is showing at the spray park field behind the pool on Main Street. This is a free event. 

Fox Theatre’s concession opens at 8 and it is recommended that viewers bring their own lawn chairs and blankets, and wear warm layers.

 

See full Rodeo Week feature section here!

 

Box of grocery items with sign indicating food donations

Legion food hampers fill holiday need

 

Pincher Creek’s Royal Canadian Legion Branch 43 ran a successful Christmas hamper project this past holiday season. The project has grown into a long-standing tradition of the Legion, one that has supported many households since its inaugural year.

The Christmas hampers are intended to assist local families who struggle with food insecurity, providing enough food to ideally last families the entirety of the Christmas holidays. Any leftover food that remained after the project was organized and taken to the Pincher Creek and District Food Centre to assist locals in the future.

With the help of many local organizations and selfless individuals, the Legion was able to put together and hand out about 100 food hampers to families within the town and MD of Pincher Creek who had previously signed up.

“We had a lot of support from many of the service clubs and various organizations and it made for a tremendous number of volunteers this year — it was amazing to see,” says Maggie Christians, president of Legion Branch 43.

 

Table setting of wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

On top of numerous individual volunteers, the Legion received help from several notable entities such as the Pincher Creek women’s shelter, the area 4-H clubs, Napi Friendship Association, the local Lions clubs, the Pincher Creek food centre and many more wonderful groups looking to support the community.

Maggie not only expressed tremendous gratitude to all those who contributed to the project, but furthermore expressed the value of giving such support to the community.

“It always means something when you can help others and this year we had a lot of great  people help. It means a lot to not only the people receiving hampers but to everybody that helped out,” she says.

“It’s just simply a good thing and to do this always feels good. It worked out really well this year.”

 

 

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Male youth pins poppy to Remembrance Day cross held by female youth, while another male youth stands at attention, on the front page of Shootin' the Breeze. Alberta news from Pincher Creek area and Crowsnest Pass.

Nov. 9, 2022

We will remember them

Peter Van Bussel and Abigail Rigaux receive a poppy from Walker Anderson at the MHHS Remembrance Day assembly in Pincher Creek.

Kids trick or treating in lion costumes – one roaring and one smiling on the front page of Shootin' the Breeze. Alberta news from Pincher Creek area and Crowsnest Pass.

Nov. 2, 2022

Lion’s share of fun

Ames and Miles were spotted enjoying Spooky Town and the great weather Saturday at Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village in Pincher Creek.

Curling rock with red handle is pushed with a stick in a game of sturling

Pincher Creek celebrated as Alberta’s sturling hotbed

It’s official — Pincher Creek is the sturling capital of Alberta.

“What is sturling?” you may ask. Invented in Didsbury, Alta., in 1998, the sport is much like the game of curling.

The biggest difference between the sports is that, in sturling, rocks are delivered with sticks or sliding, rather than exclusively sliding when curling. Other differences include sturling teams made up of two players instead of four, and games taking only one hour to complete compared to curling’s three.

Garry Cleland, Pincher Creek’s director of sturling, helped introduce the sport to the community in 2017. What began as a group of four members — Garry and his wife, Ruth, his cousins Dennis and Mel Cleland — has now turned into 58, with more on the way.

“It’s opened the game to a whole new group of people,” Garry says, adding that individuals of all abilities can play.

Garry recently reached out to Curling Alberta to inquire about how many sturling members other communities had. He was informed that Curling Alberta does not keep track of sturling statistics, but that the sport’s inventor, Carson Schultz, had all of the numbers available.

After contacting Carson, Garry found out that only one community had more members than Pincher Creek — Red Deer, with 60. However, with Red Deer’s population at just above 100,000 and Pincher Creek’s sitting below 7,000 with town and MD combined, our community has far and away the most sturlers per capita, making it the sturling capital of Alberta.

“It’s been getting very, very popular,” Garry says of the sport.