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Tag: Pat Neumann

TransAlta windmill on fire with a trail of black smoke near Cowley, Alberta.

Emergency crews respond swiftly to wind turbine fire near Cowley

On July 9, Pincher Creek Emergency Services was notified just after 6 p.m. of smoke, and eventually flames, coming from a TransAlta wind turbine along the Cowley Ridge.

Crews were sent out from the Pincher Creek and Lundbreck fire stations to contain the area around the turbine and ensure that any dropping debris or fire was stopped dead in its tracks.   

“We didn’t fight any fire in the turbine itself because, of course, that’s not safe,” says Chief Pat Neumann of PCES.

“We had crews on the scene for about three hours, basically maintaining the area around the turbine to make sure that any dropping debris or fire was stopped from extending outward from the turbine, and that’s about the extent of it.”

A huge shout-out to Pincher Creek Emergency Services for responding promptly to the hazard.

 

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Exterior view of Triple T Energy building in Pincher Creek

New Pincher Creek fire hall location chosen

A new, larger fire hall and ambulance station to replace their cramped space is something first responders in Pincher Creek have long been hoping for. As of last week, that’s now becoming a reality.

“This is very exciting for our department as we make the move towards a bigger facility,” Chief Pat Neumann said Friday after receiving the keys to the former Triple T Energy Services building on Hunter Street.

“This is something that’s been much-needed for a long time.”

The new Pincher Creek Emergency Services home, just east of the RCMP detachment off Highway 6, will get some modifications and renovations. For now, however, there’s no set timeline.

“All of our equipment [from the hall on Charlotte Street], we’re going to try and reuse and take what we can out of the existing facility, and that includes all of our apparatus and tools,” Neumann said.

A larger space will create a safer working environment for staff and the department’s volunteer core, he added, and a fenced compound next door will provide the means to carry out practice training on such things as vehicle extrications.

The new facility was also chosen for its location.

“It was one of the things we considered when we looked at a new hall,” Neumann said. “No. 1, highway access for our equipment to get where it needed to go, and second, easy access for our crews to get here quickly from their homes.”

 

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Dave Cox, MD of Pincher Creek reeve and a former fire chief, is also thrilled to see the possibilities the new building will bring.

“We need the floor space. The current building is 40 years old and our crews are literally stepping on bumpers to get from one lane to another because there is so little room,” Cox said.

“We’ve renovated that building quite a few times, taking recreation space, turning it into living space and office space. We’ve pretty much made the best use of that building as we could, so this [new] opportunity will be good for us.”

Pincher Creek Mayor Don Anderberg agrees.

“One of the big issues we’ve got is space and an older building, so having the chance to buy this building and the property that goes with it is a real plus. It’s been on the radar screen for a long time, knowing that we’re going to have to do something, renovate the old building and add space or go to a new facility,” the mayor said.

“So, when this building came up for sale, we looked at it and saw that it could be a really good fit for what we envisioned for the future.”

The current facility at 655 Charlotte St., in place as a hall since the early 1980s, has brought with it some limitations over time, Anderberg added.

“One thing that has been talked about over the years is a ladder truck. [We] weren’t able to accommodate that in the existing hall, so it gives lots of opportunities for future growth and change.”

 

 

Pig roast at wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.
Dano's Hydro Heaven in Pincher Creek fully engulfed in flames in the darkness on Jan. 9, 2023.

Pincher Creek fire crews respond to two fires just minutes apart

An investigation is underway into the cause of two fires late Tuesday afternoon in Pincher Creek.

The blazes, reported just minutes apart, happened at a home in the 600-block of Adelaide Street and a business at the corner of East Avenue and Kettles Street.

“This one [Dano’s Hydro Heaven] was our first reported structure fire on which we received multiple call-ins,” explained fire Chief Pat Neumann Tuesday evening. “As we arrived on scene, we got reports of a second structure fire.”

Officials are looking into a possible connection.

While more details are expected in the coming days, Neumann confirmed the first 911 calls of the downtown blaze came in at about 5:05 p.m.

Smoke and, eventually, flames could be seen coming from the building following a large blast that buckled its west wall. This gained the attention of people at nearby businesses, including staff at Canada Post, and those walking in the area.

 

 

Neumann said Pincher Creek Emergency Services crews from Pincher Creek, Beaver Mines and Lundbreck were called out. Mutual aid was also provided on the house fire by Cowley Fire Rescue, while paramedics from Pincher Creek and Peigan District Ambulance Service in Brocket were dispatched to administer medical aid.

RCMP from Pincher Creek and the Piikani Nation were also at the scene of both fires to help with traffic control.

Witnesses report seeing a handcuffed male inside a police cruiser near the Adelaide Street blaze, but authorities have yet to confirm if the person or persons responsible have been taken into custody.

Both structures were completely destroyed and, at this point, it’s too early to determine the cost of damage in either case.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

 

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Auto-Pulse unit, which automates chest compressions, demonstrated on a manequin torso.

Beaver Mines first responders now equipped with AutoPulse unit

It’s known as AutoPulse — an automated, portable, battery-powered device that can help first responders in lifesaving efforts.

Like a person performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the unit, when connected to the patient, provides chest compressions and, if needed, administers electric shocks, just like a defibrillator might, but saving valuable time in the process.

With a price tag of nearly $17,000, the cost can be out of reach for many fire departments and ambulance operations in small communities, particularly if they cover a large area, and when more than one might be needed.

Thankfully, though, through a recent donation by one local business, Pincher Creek Emergency Services has been able to acquire a second such unit, strategically placing it at its Beaver Mines fire hall operation.

“With the growing number of users in the backcountry and with the population aging, it’s just one more tool we can use to get the people the help they need,” said PCES fire Chief Pat Neumann.

“We’ve done the research and we know it makes a difference and increases the chances of positive patient outcomes, and for us, with the help of our donors, it’s a wise investment.”

 

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The first unit, already being used in Pincher Creek, has yielded at least two positive outcomes in its time.

“This is an important piece of equipment for our local responders,” said Wendy Desjarlais, Vision Credit Union’s Pincher Creek branch manager, after seeing a demonstration of the AutoPulse in action.

“Especially, where the population at Castle Mountain can explode over the winter, as they said here, to 2,500. There’s so much risk of injury. The fact that this location [Beaver Mines] can respond so much faster and stabilize people so much faster is crucial. You never know. It could help someone you or I know and love.”

Earlier this year, Vision Credit Union presented a cheque for $10,000 to PCES toward the purchase of the unit, a key piece of equipment Division 3 Coun. Dave Cox is glad to see in the fire hall’s arsenal.

“This [unit] will really enhance the capability of our fire-ambulance rescue service in our community. To have this tool in our remote station will really be a benefit,” said Cox, a former fire chief for the region, but also someone who got his start at the Beaver Mines hall.

“The key is timely intervention and anything that comes out of Pincher Creek is 10, maybe 15 minutes out, depending on how fast they can drive, and that’s really the survival window for someone who’s in cardiac arrest.”

And, response time from Pincher can be doubled or tripled, with poor road conditions, if the call is out at Castle Mountain.

While the hope is the unit is never needed, there’s every indication that it will be, and with that in mind, Chief Neumann, knowing its value, is already focusing on adding at least two more units to the fleet — one for the Lundbreck hall, the other for Pincher Creek.

 

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Matthew Peterson, smiling man with short dark hair in emergency services uniform.

It takes a special person to be a volunteer firefighter

Raised in Crowsnest Pass, and having spent time away from the area as a young adult, Lt. Matthew Peterson has returned to make Pincher Creek his latest home base.

A former newspaper reporter and editor in British Columbia., the volunteer officer switched careers about 10 years ago to try his hand at mining near where he grew up.

“I actually started my emergency services training through the mine with the mine rescue program,” Matthew says. “I really liked the training. I really liked the things we were doing, so I decided to join the local fire department in Crowsnest Pass.”

When the family decided to move to Pincher Creek, Matthew approached fire Chief Pat Neumann to ask if he could become a lieutenant, a rank he had in Crowsnest Pass.

“So, I came over here and worked my way up, got to know everybody in the area and the people,” he says. “It’s been a good fit.”

Matthew admits it takes a special kind of person to be, not only a firefighter, but a volunteer firefighter.

“It’s a huge sacrifice that all the members make, having our families and commitments, our day jobs … to be able to put those things aside,” he says. “At times, we have to leave the family dinner, leave the family outing.”

It’s a decision he’s glad he made years ago, but it does come with an added responsibility.

 

Table setting of wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

“You know, some of the guys might like to go out for a few beers after work, but you have to make a conscious choice, where that’s not an option, where I want to be on call for my community if they need me.”

Matthew’s favourite part about the role is the training that’s provided.

 “A lot of really cool things you get to learn, a lot of really good stuff,” he says. “Just being able to use those skills when you go out on calls, it’s huge … and it’s needed.”

And, what kid wouldn’t want to grow up driving a real fire truck?

Unlike some volunteer opportunities where there might be requirements going in, all the training is provided by the department at no cost to the firefighter. But having transferable skills certainly doesn’t hurt.

“In my case, I had my industrial first aid ticket and, of course, my mine rescue training,” Matthew says.

Is being a volunteer firefighter something he’d recommend to a friend or someone in the community? Absolutely!

“I mean, you see those big TV shows like Chicago Fire and such, but in reality it’s us. It’s the people next door, it’s your auto mechanic, it’s your coal miner, that are going to be coming to help you at the end of the day.”

Thank you, Matthew, and to all our firefighters for being there!

 

 

Aerial view of the Cowley Lions Campground on the Castle River in southwestern Alberta

 

Map of Alberta showing fire advisory for MD of Pincher Creek Area

Fire danger rating lowered, thanks to recent rain

For the second time this month, the fire danger rating in the town and MD of Pincher Creek has been lowered.

In early September, a ban in place for most of the summer was eased to a fire restriction.

“On Saturday the 21st we downgraded it, again, to a fire advisory with the rain and conditions having improved,” fire Chief Pat Neumann tells Shootin’ the Breeze.

Unlike August, though, when almost all the month’s rain fell during an Aug. 30 thunderstorm, this month’s moisture has been spread out, allowing the vegetation to green up.

But, Neumann warns, conditions can change on a dime.

“So, what a fire advisory allows people to do is have recreational firepits with a permit. It also allows us to issue debris burn permits or notification of burn for residents within the MD.”

It’s also important to note that the district may not necessarily have the final say on where fires are allowed.

 

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“One of the things that makes our MD unique is a protected forest area, which resides mostly on the western edge that is governed under forestry guidelines,” Neumann says.

“So, what that means is they need to pay attention to what Alberta Forestry posts in regards to fire restrictions and fire bans, and currently we don’t have any.”

As we move into the first full week of fall, Neumann is thankful for one thing: the quiet fire season the area has enjoyed.

“Given the conditions we had elsewhere in the province, the Northwest Territories and B.C., there was an awful lot of media education, making sure people understood the risks and hazards of the landscape.”

People are pretty understanding when it comes to having some freedoms taken away, he says, referring to the long-standing tradition of families gathering around a campfire, something that couldn’t happen this past summer.

“We didn’t have a whole lot of man-made fires started within the rural landscape this year and that’s really a testament to people actually paying more attention to the conditions.”

Full updated details on fire bans for the MD are posted online at www.pincherfire.ca. There, you’ll also find information on fire bans from around the province as well as how to apply for burn and firepit notifications.

 

Baby with bright blue eyes has face scrunched up in reaction to stinky smell

Chemical spill stinks up Pincher Creek

A small chemical spill cast a noxious stink over the east side of Pincher Creek on Sunday morning, according to Pincher Creek Emergency Services.

A spokesperson for the Alberta Energy Regulator said about 100 litres of petroleum distillate, a strong-smelling precursor to gasoline, was spilled in three spots between a bulk fuel station on the 1000 block of Main Street and Highway 6, starting at around 9:30 a.m.

No one was hurt and the spill did not reach any waterways, PCES Chief Pat Neumann told Shootin’ the Breeze

The distillate leaked from a fuel truck coming from the former Shell Waterton gas plant near Twin Butte, according to a statement Monday from Plains Midstream Canada, a Calgary-based firm that provides logistical support to oil and gas companies. 

The company said it’s investigating the cause and exact volume of the spill. 

 

 

“Our priorities are to protect the safety of everyone in the area and minimize any impacts to the environment. We have completed initial surface clean up, offloaded the product from the trailer, and safely removed the truck and trailer from the area,” the statement continued. 

Neumann said the truck driver “did everything proactively as soon as he realized what was going on,” driving to nearby Pincher Station, where he set about containing the leak. 

PCES contacted Transport Canada’s emergency centre, CANUTEC, and then joined cleanup efforts led by the fuel transport company.

“The cleanup is already substantively wrapped up” at each of the three spill sites, Neumann said.

Plains Midstream thanked PCES for their prompt response, telling the Breeze, “We are continuing to work with PCES to monitor air quality and conduct further remediation, as required.”

 

 

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Fire truck parked on highway surrounded by vehicles in swirling snow after a multi-vehicle crash near Pincher Creek.

Two hospitalized after at least eight vehicles collide at Cowley

Pincher Creek RCMP are investigating a series of multiple-vehicle collisions on Highway 3 between Pincher Station and Cowley, according to Sgt. Ryan Hodge.

Hodge confirmed there were a few injuries among motorists involved in four collisions reported near Pincher Station between 4 p.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. Thursday.

First responders closed Highway 3 near Cowley at around 10 a.m. Thursday, following a second series of collisions. 

Hodge said it wasn’t clear exactly how many vehicles were involved in either smash-up as of Thursday afternoon.

 

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Pat Neumann, chief of Pincher Creek Emergency Services, said at least eight vehicles were involved in the Cowley pileup, including multiple tractor-trailers.

Neumann said two people were taken to hospital with moderate injuries. One was treated in Pincher Creek hospital and later transferred to Chinook Regional Hospital in Lethbridge, while the other was taken to Crowsnest Pass hospital, then airlifted to a Calgary hospital.

PCES on Wednesday evening attended a single-vehicle rollover on a stretch of Highway 22 near Lundbreck and a multiple-vehicle collision on Highway 6 near Pincher Creek, Neumann said.

 

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Hodge said charges are expected against drivers believed to be responsible for some of the pileups, as per Alberta’s Traffic and Safety Act, advising that the detachment’s investigation could last through the weekend. 

What is clear is that many drivers aren’t driving to winter highway conditions, which Hodge said are notoriously treacherous between Pincher Station and Crowsnest Pass. 

Snowdrifts had crept onto Highway 3 at Pincher Station by late Wednesday afternoon, but responding officers reported adequate visibility. Neumann said the highway was slippery near Cowley Thursday morning, adding that blowing snow had reduced visibility.

 

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“People aren’t slowing down. They aren’t driving to road conditions,” Hodge said. 

Mounties don’t believe drugs or alcohol were involved in any of the collisions they attended, he said. 

Pincher Creek RCMP strongly recommend that drivers use caution on Highway 3. 

“When you see a snowdrift on the highway, slow down and wait until it’s safe to drive around it,” Hodge said.

 

 

 

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Emergency workers work on an evening accident scene on icy roads near Pincher Station

Charges may await some drivers in Highway 3 pileups

Pincher Creek RCMP are investigating a series of multiple-vehicle collisions on Highway 3 between Pincher Station and Cowley, according to Sgt. Ryan Hodge.

Hodge confirmed a few minor injuries among motorists involved in four collisions reported near Pincher Station between 4 p.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. Thursday.

First responders closed Highway 3 near Cowley at around 11 a.m. Thursday, following a second series of collisions. 

Hodge said it wasn’t clear how many vehicles were involved in either smash-up as of Thursday afternoon. Mounties left the highway at about noon, he said. 

Charges are expected against drivers believed to be responsible for some of the pileups, as per Alberta’s Traffic and Safety Act, with Hodge advising that the Mounties’ investigation could last through the weekend.

 

 

What is clear is that many drivers aren’t driving to winter highway conditions, which Hodge said are notoriously treacherous between Pincher Station and Crowsnest Pass. 

Snowdrifts had crept onto the highway at Pincher Station by late Wednesday afternoon, but responding officers said visibility was decent.

“People aren’t slowing down,” Hodge said. “They aren’t driving to road conditions.” 

Mounties don’t believe drugs or alcohol were involved in any of the collisions, he said. 

Pat Neumann, chief at Pincher Creek Emergency Services, wasn’t immediately available for comment before Shootin’ the Breeze filed this story online Thursday afternoon. 

Pincher Creek RCMP strongly recommend that drivers use caution on Highway 3. 

“When you see a snowdrift on the highway, slow down and wait until it’s safe to drive around it,” Hodge said.

 

 

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Fire truck parked on highway surrounded by vehicles in swirling snow after a multi-vehicle crash near Pincher Creek.

Multi-vehicle pile-up closes Highway 3 at Cowley

First responders have shut down Highway 3 near the Village of Cowley following a multiple-car pile-up.
Pincher Creek Emergency Services announced the closure shortly before 11 a.m., citing the need to protect service members.

Details are sparse at this point, and Shootin’ the Breeze is awaiting comment from PCES Chief Pat Neumann as well as Pincher Creek RCMP.

PCES reported a multi-car collision on the highway at Pincher Station late Wednesday night. Shootin’ the Breeze is awaiting comment on that incident as well.

Emergency Services are recommending that motorists avoid Highway 3 between Pincher Station and Cowley.

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Male with short, dark hair and woman with dark dark hair and cap, stand in front of an ambulance. Both are dressed in navy blue uniforms. Pat Neumann is the Pincher Creek fire chief and Sariah Brasnett is deputy-chief.

Wait times at urban hospitals tying up Pincher Creek ambulances

Increasing wait times at urban hospitals are delaying treatments for patients transferred by Pincher Creek Emergency Services’ ambulance crews and tying up paramedics, PCES Chief Pat Neumann told Shootin’ the Breeze.

Neumann said PCES crews have long experienced these delays at Calgary hospitals, especially at Foothills Medical Centre, which Neumann said handles most of the cardiac emergencies, advanced heart treatments and diagnostics, and complex traumas within Alberta Health Services’ south zone.

But similar bottlenecks have hit the Chinook Regional Hospital in Lethbridge, which also takes routine and emergency patients from Pincher Creek and surrounding areas, and where Neumann said PCES crews have consistently reported emergency room delays since last summer. 

“Lethbridge is terrible now” for wait times, Neumann said.

“It’s to a point where, unless they actually are admitting the patient to the ER right away, (PCES crews) are typically waiting every time they go now.”

 

 

A return trip to Calgary will tie up a PCES ambulance crew for at least five hours, with crews spending at least three hours on trips to and from Lethbridge, the chief explained.

The department has two ambulances. When one has to travel to and from Calgary or Lethbridge, “That only leaves one ambulance in this community to do any other urgent transfers going out of this area, or to respond to any other emergency call,” Neumann said. 

Longer waits are the norm when urban hospitals increasingly provide routine treatment and diagnostics for rural patients. At the same time, Neumann said his crews now attend calls from town residents struggling to access primary care.

“We’re picking people up that are going to the (Pincher Creek) Health Centre because they don’t have a doctor. They don’t know what else to do to get the services they need.” 

 

 

 

Patients are showing up at the health centre sicker than they might have been if they’d had regular care from a family doctor, and the problem “compounds itself” as the hospital’s doctors and nurses scramble to fill the gap, Neumann explained. 

Six doctors now work at the health centre and its attached medical clinic, down from 11 several years ago, according to the clinic’s executive director, Jeff Brockmann. (Dr. Gavin Parker manages the health centre’s ER.)

Local ambulance calls have more than doubled since Neumann started at PCES roughly 20 years ago, with hospital transfers up by a similar margin. Crews that responded to just under 750 calls in 2005 were handling over 1,500 in 2018. Transfers meanwhile climbed from around 350 to just over 600 in the same period, according to PCES statistics. 

 

 

The town’s population held at around 3,700 for much of that time, but shrank to around 3,400 by 2021, according to the Government of Alberta’s online regional dashboard. 

Just over 25 per cent of residents are 65 or older — a slight proportional increase over 2016, according to Statistics Canada’s 2021 census. As Neumann suggested, the town isn’t getting bigger — it’s getting older.

In response, Health Minister Jason Copping said the Alberta government is investing in rural health care. 

Copping said at a media roundtable Monday that the province had put up $1 million to explore options to train doctors at the University of Lethbridge and nearby Northwestern Polytechnic. 

 

 

“We recognize that we need to train and hire locally, and by getting those seats out in rural Alberta, the more likely that (graduating doctors) are going to stay,” he said.

Copping stressed that Alberta’s United Conservative Party provided many more millions in budget 2022, including the UCP’s new collective agreement with Alberta’s doctors. 

The province further hopes to attract foreign doctors by “leveraging immigration.” Seventeen doctors from outside Canada have agreed to work in Lethbridge, with some already working there. 

“I can tell you more is coming.… So, stay tuned,” Copping said. 

 

 

Dark-haired woman in white shirt leans against a dark brown podium and speaks into a microphone while two men listen with interest from a table to the side of her

Short-term rental bylaw amendment deferred

Pincher Creek’s town council voted late Monday to defer its vote on a bylaw amendment designed to regulate short-term rentals within town limits.

Monday’s decision at chambers followed a lengthy public hearing that saw around 50 residents and at least one out-of-town investor pile into the gym at town hall, with many speaking for and against the amendment.

If passed, the amendment would put permitting and licensing requirements on upwards of 20 short-term rentals already operating in town through tourist accommodation websites like Airbnb and VRBO, and limiting STRs not lived in by their operators to five per cent of homes per residential street.

No such limit would apply to STRs with live-in operators. Bed-and-breakfast operators would not be allowed to operate STRs on their licenced premises.

Pincher Creek’s current land use bylaw doesn’t mention STRs at all, though in practice, town hall has granted business licences on an ad-hoc basis to operators that have applied, according to chief administrative officer Laurie Wilgosh.

The bylaw was drafted by Steve Harty of the Lethbridge planning commission, Oldman River Regional Services, which Wilgosh said provides planning and development guidance to Pincher Creek and several outlying municipalities.

 

 

Reading his council report to start Monday’s hearing, Harty told the audience that the town’s STR industry needs some form of regulation amid growing concerns on the part of operators who want clear expectations from town hall and residents who say STRs are putting pressure on the town’s tight long-term rental and real estate markets. STRs are meanwhile subject to the province’s new tourist levy and the federal GST, Harty added.

Speaking for the amendment, Lane Heggie said he owned and operated a purpose-built STR on the 1000-block of Livingston Way, but doesn’t live in Pincher Creek.

Clear, reasonable regulations would serve the community well, he said, adding that operators should talk frequently with their neighbours to speedily resolve conflicts.

Lynn Brasnett, a longtime area Realtor and former rental property manager, pointedly reminded the audience that shutting out STRs would do little to boost the town’s rental stock.

“We have run a less than one per cent vacancy rate in this town for over 30 years,” she said, insisting that many STR operators would likely have to sell off their investment properties if they couldn’t market their services on Airbnb, or the like.

 

 

Japhia Epp told Monday’s hearing that her and her husband’s short-term rentals boost other small businesses in Pincher Creek. Photo by Laurie Tritschler
Japhia Epp told Monday’s hearing that her and her husband’s short-term rentals boost other small businesses in Pincher Creek. Photo by Laurie Tritschler
Pincher Creek residents Joan Brees, left,  and Chantal Laliberte chat before addressing Monday’s public hearing. Photo by Laurie Tritschler
Pincher Creek residents Joan Brees, left, and Chantal Laliberte chat before addressing Monday’s public hearing. Photo by Laurie Tritschler
Coun. Brian Wright looks on as Realtor Lynn Brasnett speaks at Monday’s public hearing. Photo by Laurie Tritschler
Coun. Brian Wright looks on as Realtor Lynn Brasnett speaks at Monday’s public hearing. Photo by Laurie Tritschler

 

 

Jenae Toews, who runs an STR in town with her husband, agreed.

“At this time in our lives, with my husband doing school, we more than likely wouldn’t be able to afford to keep the property as a long-term rental,” she said.  

Japhia Epp, a paramedic with Pincher Creek Emergency Services, said she and her husband own three long-term rentals and four STRs.

“We get a lot of families that come to Pincher Creek, and some of them say, ‘We would not come here if there wasn’t a place to stay like this.’ ”

Epp went on to say that she and her husband actively promote other local businesses to their Airbnb guests.

Coun. Wayne Oliver then asked Epp how she’d feel about living next to an STR.

“I am a neighbour to a short-term rental in this community,” she replied. “I do know the owners of the house and have regular communication with them. The idea is that, ‘If anything goes wrong, you let me know.’ ”

 

 

Speaking against the bylaw, Chantal Laliberte stressed the town’s burgeoning housing crisis.

“If Pincher Creek was a town with plenty of long-term rentals and plenty of affordable housing, I wouldn’t be standing here, talking to you

“Housing is not like any other commodity. It’s not like gold, which is a commodity but is not a human right,” she said, drawing on the UN’s founding text, which enshrines the right to adequate housing.

Joan Brees then took the podium, listing 22 questions and concerns from residents she said weren’t able to attend the hearing. These ranged from the town’s apparent lack of authority to enforce whatever regulations council might approve to noise complaints, parking shortages and safety concerns by worried neighbours.

One resident who spoke to Brees said a vacation home on their block had been rented to 15 people “and kiddos” last summer. Residents don’t want to see “party people” take over their streets, Brees said.

 

 

Sgt. Ryan Hodge, commanding officer at Pincher Creek RCMP, said Monday afternoon that he was not aware of any 911 complaints specifically related to disturbances or noise complaints at local STRs.

Pat Neumann, chief of Pincher Creek Emergency Services, said in a written statement to council that he would welcome the amendment’s regulations, noting that a map of active STRs would probably help fire and ambulance crews.

Presiding over council’s meeting at chambers, Mayor Don Anderberg and Coun. Oliver were quick to suggest putting off a final vote.

“Getting this right would be nice, right off the bat,” Anderberg said.

While he was personally in favour of regulating STRs, the mayor cautioned that council needed more time to deliberate.

Coun. Sahra Nodge countered that council should come to a vote, having just taken in “a very respectful, very informative public hearing.”

But the emerging consensus resolved that the amendment needed tightening up, ending in a unanimous vote to revisit the amendment at council’s next meeting, Monday, Nov. 28.

 

 

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