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Tag: Marie Everts

Patrick, Bette and Philip Mitchell accept the Farm Family of the Year Award for Flint Rock Ranch.

Flint Rock Ranch wins Farm Family of the Year

The 2023 Farm Family of the Year is none other than the Mitchells of Flint Rock Ranch, a new addition to a long-trusted name in cattle ranching in our community.

“We were pretty shocked, the award was extremely unexpected,” stated Patrick Mitchell, Flint Rock’s head of hospitality.

“We thought, no way we are gonna win. Even if you don’t think you’re gonna win, be prepared just in case,” he said with a laugh.

Since the 1950s, Mitchell Bros. Beef has been raising high-quality, 100 per cent grass-fed cattle in southern Alberta. Recently, Flint Rock Ranch has expanded its business, hosting a variety of events with local musicians, including Frog Fest. In addition, the ranch offers unique accommodations in three different Airstream RVs and three cozy cabins.

“This award definitely gelled our spot. Feels good to know our hard work is getting noticed,” Patrick said.

“We could not have done it without Lori Holmes and her countless hours of volunteering this summer. I’d also like to shout-out Marie Everts who has been a huge resource for us. She’s in our corner. It’s helpful to have locals that are so supportive,” Patrick mentioned.

As a family, the Mitchells have been working together on their business, spending more time together on the ranch, growing together. From construction to networking, each brother has his own niche skills to help out.

To have a successful business in Pincher Creek, Patrick said, “Be persistent and patient, and don’t leave anything outside that can get blown around by the wind.”

In the coming seasons, the Mitchells plan to shift their focus from beef more to hospitality, with great success in rentals this past summer. There is a potential for more community events like ranch dinners and dances.

Flint Rock Ranch extends a kind thanks to whomever nominated them and to the community for continued support.

The Mitchells accepted the Farm Family of the Year Award at the Pincher Creek and District Chamber of Commerce’s 28th annual Awards of Excellence, held Oct. 20.

Five other families were also nominated in this category. Read the nominations here.

See all Awards of Excellence category winners here.

 

Pump bottles of colourful, natural soaps on ad for Lynden House Market in Pincher Creek

 

Patrick, Bette and Philip Mitchell accept the Farm Family of the Year Award for Flint Rock Ranch.

Flint Rock Ranch won the award for Farm Family of the Year. Pictured from left are son Patrick with parents Bette and Philip Mitchell. | Photo by William Cockerell

 

Table setting of wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

 

Five RCMP officers in red serge

Royal Canadian Mounted Parade

Button up your red jackets and put on your Mountie hats — this parade we’re celebrating 150 years of the RCMP.

“Parade is one of those small-town charm events where everyone — no matter their background, no matter their income, no matter their demographic — can all come together as a community and celebrate what we have,” says Marie Everts, longtime parade organizer.

“Businesses are always very creative and we look forward to seeing how they are going to be celebrating this milestone of the 150 years of the RCMP.” 

Saturday’s parade currently has 45 floats participating and the parade committee is eagerly welcoming more.

“We will happily take last-minute registrations, but we really encourage people to get registered prior to, so we can get all of our prep work done,” Marie says.

You can register a float for the parade with your name and organization on the events page of www.pincherchamber.ca.

“It’s a great time to showcase our business community and our organizations, and come together as one community to just be together and celebrate,” Marie says.

 

Tires on ad for safe winter travel with winter tires from Fountain Tire in Pincher Creek

 

Judges will decide on the best floats in eight categories: overall, municipal, organization/service club, commercial, horse section, cultural dress/traditional, children — bike/novelty, and vintage vehicle. Extra points will be awarded for adhering to the RCMP theme.

Linda Davies, manager of Pincher Creek and District Chamber of Commerce, emphasizes community at this event’s centre.

“This is my first time attending the Pincher Creek parade, so I’m very excited to see all of my new community celebrating together, and the creative ideas that the businesses and the groups are going to come up with for their floats,” Linda says. “I’m really looking forward to it.”

Marie agrees.

“Parade is fun, and celebrating community is so important to us to recognize what we have, why we live in this community, why we contribute, why we volunteer, and how that positively affects our residents and community members,” she says.

The parade is all-weather and begins down Main Street at 11 a.m., Aug. 19, in rain, snow or sunshine.

The family-friendly event entails lots of candy for children, but also requires community members to exercise safety and prudence.

“Together as a community, we need to ensure that parade is a safe space for everyone, so that includes ensuring that our kids and our small residents in the community don’t run in the street,” Marie says.

“We need to work together to have a safe, respectful parade so we can continue to do this event.”

This Saturday, the town of Pincher Creek looks forward to welcoming you to the parade.

“It’s shaping up to be a fabulous parade this year,” Marie says.

 

Young boy squeals with delight while riding a sheep

Local kids ridin’ into rodeo weekend

Local youths will put their best boot forward this weekend as they participate in various events, including the kids rodeo, mutton bustin’, wild ponies and more.

“They’re our future rodeo stars,” says Marie Everts, a member of the rodeo organizing committee.

“Having youth involved in the rodeo weekend is always an important aspect of the events in order to grow these future rodeo champions, stars, volunteers, participants and all of the other people that make the rodeo a success.”

The opportunities for the future rodeo stars begin Friday at 10 a.m. with the Kids Fun Rodeo, a free event for participants and spectators alike. 

The Kids Rodeo features a wide range of events, including keyhole races, barrel racing, pole bending, flag races, a boot race and, a favourite among spectators, the toilet paper race.

Anyone 18 and under is welcome to participate. Those interested must register in person at the rodeo grounds between 8:30 and 9:30 a.m. on the event day. A parent or guardian must be present to sign a waiver.

 

Gift certificates on ad for Blairmore IGA

 

The fun doesn’t stop there for kids, as local youths will compete in mutton bustin’ at noon on Sunday. Children aged three to six will be put to the test as they attempt to ride sheep in the rodeo arena.

Despite increasing the number of available sheep for this year’s rodeo by 10 compared to last year, all 30 sheep have a rider ready for the event.

Participants in the mutton bustin’ event must have a properly fitted helmet and be at the arena by 11:45 a.m. on Sunday.

Wild ponies will return once more as the followup to the bull riders on Saturday and Sunday. 

Following the event’s successful debut during last year’s rodeo, children aged nine to 14 will compete in teams of three to see who can mount and stay on a bucking pony the longest.

One team member acts as the anchor, holding the pony and trying to slow it down, another attempts to put their arms around the pony’s neck to hold it still, and the third is the rider.

 

Indoor and outdoor view of wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

This year’s teams feature:

—Kash Lievers, Ridge Flundra and Lachlan Stauffer

—River Koster, Nash Lund and Acey Adair

—Stran Lievers, Cooper Plain Eagle and Jaydon Vold

—Jack Emerson, Casey Emerson, and Hayden Stav

—Angelina Morris, Morgan McNabb and Natalie Donahue

—Grady Dwyer, Rudy Barrios and Sierra Chartier

Teams will be ranked based on their average times scored on Saturday and Sunday, with prizes handed out to the team with the best average.

The calf scramble is also back thanks to the Pincher Creek Legion’s donation of four bikes for the event. The scrambles will occur during intermission, following the trick riders’ performances on Saturday and Sunday.

Kids aged seven to nine and 10 to 12 can chase after a calf with a ribbon tied around its tail, with the goal being to get the ribbon and bring it back to the announcer. The fastest youngster in each age group wins the race and a bike.

Preregistration is not required and children can head down to the calf scramble once it is announced at intermission. 

Lastly, there will be a sandpit, loads of kids games and much more. There’s something for children of all ages at this year’s rodeo!

 

Head shots of four men, one woman and one silhouette on election forum cancellation notice

Scheduling conflicts derail Livingstone-Macleod election forum in Pincher Creek

A forum for Livingstone-Macleod candidates scheduled for this evening in Pincher Creek has been cancelled after the top two contenders confirmed they weren’t coming. 

Emails sent Wednesday morning to Marie Everts, who volunteered to organize the forum on behalf of the Southwest Alberta Sustainable Community Initiative, show a last-minute cancellation from the NDP’s Kevin Van Tighem and more qualified regrets from the United Conservatives’ Chelsae Petrovic, who couldn’t attend owing to a work commitment.   

Van Tighem’s campaign manager Stephanie Keyowski emailed Everts at around 9:45 a.m., writing that, “… given the UCP candidate will not be present, I am afraid Kevin must decline to attend as well.” 

Petrovic’s campaign manager Thane Hurlburt followed suit roughly an hour later. Petrovic, who is an ER nurse in Claresholm, was scheduled to work Wednesday night and couldn’t find another nurse to take her shift, despite her best efforts, Hurlburt wrote. 

 

We got your bumps and bruises covered advertisement for Osa Remedy'sRx in Pincher Creek

 

Hurlburt notified Everts late Monday afternoon that Petrovic likely wouldn’t be able to attend, but SASCI chose not to cancel the forum in hopes the candidate would find a way to come.  

“When putting together a forum, you have to set a date and hope that the candidates do their best to make it,” Everts said Wednesday afternoon. 

“I am saddened that we were not able to host a forum in Pincher Creek, but I’m grateful that Crowsnest Pass’s chamber of commerce will host a forum next week and that technology allows us to watch recent forums that did go ahead.” 

Both candidates joined the Alberta Party’s Kevin Todd, the Independence Party’s Corrie Toone and the Alberta Liberals’ Dylin Hauser at forums earlier this week in Claresholm and High River. 

 

Ace of spades card on ad for Chase the Ace at the Pincher Creek Legion

 

Hauser informed Everts last week that he couldn’t attend the Pincher forum, owing to a long-standing prior commitment, Everts said. 

The Crowsnest Pass Chamber of Commerce confirmed Wednesday afternoon that the five candidates have accepted invitations to attend the chamber’s forum on May 24. 

A sixth candidate, Erik Abildgaard, will not be attending, according to the chamber.

Profiles for all six Livingstone-Macleod candidates are available in this week’s issue of Shootin’ the Breeze.

 

Albertans head to the polls Monday, May 29.

Advanced voting is open May 23 to 27.

For voter information, including polling stations, see pages 9 to 11.

View Crowsnest Pass election forum videos here: Part 1, Part 2

Individual candidate statements:

Dylin Hauser – Alberta Liberal Party

Kevin Van Tighem – Alberta New Democratic Party

Kevin Todd – Alberta Party

Erik Abildgaard – Independent

Corrie Toone – Independence Party of Alberta

Chelsae Petrovic – United Conservative Party

 

Display of fall clothing at at Emerald & Ash Clothing in Crowsnest Pass.

 

Related articles:

Livingstone-Macleod Candidates Make Last Appeals At Crowsnest Pass Forum

‘Not Notley’ Sign To Come Down, Says MD Of Pincher Creek

Scheduling Conflicts Derail Livingstone-Macleod Election Forum In Pincher Creek

Pincher Creek Health-Care Forum Draws Large Audience

UCP Candidate Calls Out Heart Attack Survivors

Claresholm Politician Enters UCP Nomination Race For Livingstone-Macleod

Read more Livingstone-Macleod articles

 

Yellow wheat field against darker sky

Local producers may see minimal benefit from ag tax credit

The province is eagerly promoting a tax credit for Alberta’s agricultural processing industry, but food producers in Pincher Creek and neighbouring MD will likely see marginal benefits, according to local government officials.

The initiative will spur the industry through a 12 per cent non-refundable tax credit on corporate investments in Alberta processing plants of $10 million or more, Agriculture Minister Nate Horner said at a press conference Feb. 8.

“At a higher level, this means that we’re not putting raw commodities in train cars and then shipping it away,” Horner said, taking aim at Alberta’s “competitor states” in Idaho, Colorado and Texas. 

 

 

Alberta farmers had the highest operating revenue in Canada in 2020, with processed exports hitting $6.4 billion the year before, according to Statistics Canada and the Government of Alberta. Raw exports, known as primary commodities, slumped by nearly 10 per cent in 2019, amounting to $5.3 for the year.

Agribusiness in the MD is driven by ranching and grain cropping for animal feed and seed oil, all of which are primary exports, Reeve Rick Lemire told Shootin’ the Breeze

“I’m not sure how (the tax credit) would benefit us,” Lemire said, noting that any bump to regional agri-processing could indirectly boost local production. 

 

Beauty products on ad for Providence Salon & Spa in Pincher Creek

 

Marie Everts, economic development officer at the Town of Pincher Creek, said on Feb. 10 that local food producers may not have the capital to invest $10 million in their farms or ranches. 

“There are obviously going to be places that will see more of a benefit,” Horner granted. The minister qualified that southwest Alberta ranchers can expect higher demand from the region’s beef processing hub in High River. 

Horner anticipates an immediate eight per cent return on investment to Alberta taxpayers on the one hand, and a healthy boost to provincial food security on the other.

 

 

Multimillion-dollar food processing plants can stay in business for between 40 and 50 years, he explained. 

Beef dominated Alberta’s agricultural exports in 2019 in terms of value, climbing 18 per cent year over year to hit $2.4 billion, the GOA reported in 2020. Ranchers, meanwhile, shouldered the province’s biggest share of agricultural operating expenses, shelling out $8.1 billion, or roughly 42 per cent of total farm expenses, according to Stats Can. 

Wheat was Alberta’s second-highest agricultural export in 2019, followed by canola seed, crude canola oil and live cattle. Annual wheat exports fell by 13 per cent in value and 10.5 per cent in quantity, according to the provincial government.

 

 

Kids trick or treating in lion costumes – one roaring and one smiling on the front page of Shootin' the Breeze. Alberta news from Pincher Creek area and Crowsnest Pass.

Nov. 2, 2022

Lion’s share of fun

Ames and Miles were spotted enjoying Spooky Town and the great weather Saturday at Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village in Pincher Creek.