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Livingstone-Macleod election forum panelists seated at table – five men and one woman, with white-haired female moderator off to right side

Livingstone-Macleod candidates make last appeals at Crowsnest Pass forum

Riding candidates in Livingstone-Macleod gave mostly stock performances at an election forum in Crowsnest Pass on Wednesday, May 24.

The United Conservatives’ Chelsae Petrovic and the Alberta NDP’s Kevin Van Tighem, certainly no strangers to political controversy in what has been a bitterly contested election, were distinctly on-brand, repeating, defending and doubling down on their parties’ campaign planks. 

A re-elected UCP under Danielle Smith would “embrace the renewed Alberta Advantage,” Petrovic said, warning that to vote for anyone else would jeopardize her party’s recent accomplishments — especially this year’s whopping budget surplus.

Smith’s erstwhile promise to replace the Alberta RCMP with an independent provincial police force “is no longer a topic of conversation,” the candidate said. Nor does Petrovic have “any affiliation with” Take Back Alberta, the right-wing populist movement whose Marco Van Huigenbos watched the forum from the back of the room. 

Petrovic, who told TBA founder David Parker in a February podcast interview that she wouldn’t necessarily cleave to the party line if she were elected, strongly endorsed Smith’s leadership.  

Holding precisely the opposite view was Van Tighem, who wasted little time laying claim to Peter Lougheed’s Progressive Conservative legacy for the NDP. Party leader Rachel Notley would deliver “good government you can trust,” he said, holding up Smith’s “unstable and chaotic leadership” as the mirror opposite. 

An NDP government would eliminate Alberta’s small-business tax, and wouldn’t add to personal income taxes, he promised. He was less keen to engage Notley’s plan to raise the corporate tax rate from eight to 11 per cent, although he said the increased rate would stay the lowest in Canada. 

The Alberta Party’s Kevin Todd, who briefly entertained a run at the UCP nomination, repeatedly positioned himself as an independent voice for Livingstone-Macleod, reminding the audience that his party doesn’t whip votes — unlike the UCP and NDP.

Real Estate Centre Ad – Pincher Creek Trade Show

Van Tighem took knocks for his untrammelled opposition to coal exploration on the Eastern Rockies. 

“It’s a terrible position to take,” Pincher Creek MD councillor John MacGarva said from the floor, drawing thunderous applause from roughly half the audience. 

Lougheed’s PC’s blocked regional coal exploration for perfectly sound ecological reasons, Van Tighem shot back, scoring loud approval from the other half. 

Another resident introduced himself to Van Tighem as “one of those entitled rednecks you despise,” alluding to the candidate’s 2021 Alberta Views article wherein the author paints a disconcerting stereotype of oil and gas workers. 

The candidate said the article’s subtext underlined widely held conceptions about a rapacious oil and gas industry — conceptions Van Tighem has consistently said hurt Alberta’s interests on the world stage — but the barb stuck. 

Petrovic and Independence Party candidate Corrie Toone were pointedly asked if they would support a woman’s right to choose an abortion. Neither candidate gave a yes or no answer, despite prodding from moderator Val Danielson. 

Toone and Petrovic each said “life begins at conception,” with Petrovic saying that, while she supported bodily autonomy when it came to vaccines, she and the UCP are “pro-life.” 

The most compelling performance came from the Alberta Liberals’ Dylin Hauser, if audience reactions are to be any guide. 

Aerial view of the Cowley Lions Campground on the Castle River in southwestern Alberta

When the candidates were asked to defend their leadership credentials, Hauser was the only one who gave a full “with flaws and all” recounting of a life well lived, but also tempered by ordinary struggles. 

“What do I bring?” he asked rhetorically. “I bring failure. I bring hardship. I bring the ups and downs we all face down in life.”

His answer palpably won over the audience, drawing applause so loud and intense, it rumbled the floor. Many cheered as strenuously Hauser’s call to “vote for who you want,” rather than voting in the least offensive party with the most realistic chances of forming Alberta’s next government. 

Toone and independent candidate Erik Abildgaard spent much time trying to convince the audience that climate change was bogus, that pandemic health restrictions were draconian and that the UCP and NDP were fundamentally untrustworthy. 

Ad for Dragons Heart Quilt Shop in Pincher Creek

Albertans head to the polls Monday, May 29.

Advanced voting is open May 23 to 27.

For voter information, including polling stations, see pages 9 to 11.

View Crowsnest Pass election forum videos here: Part 1, Part 2

Individual candidate statements:

Dylin Hauser – Alberta Liberal Party

Kevin Van Tighem – Alberta New Democratic Party

Kevin Todd – Alberta Party

Erik Abildgaard – Independent

Corrie Toone – Independence Party of Alberta

Chelsae Petrovic – United Conservative Party

Related articles:

Livingstone-Macleod Candidates Make Last Appeals At Crowsnest Pass Forum

‘Not Notley’ Sign To Come Down, Says MD Of Pincher Creek

Scheduling Conflicts Derail Livingstone-Macleod Election Forum In Pincher Creek

Pincher Creek Health-Care Forum Draws Large Audience

UCP Candidate Calls Out Heart Attack Survivors

Claresholm Politician Enters UCP Nomination Race For Livingstone-Macleod

Read more Livingstone-Macleod articles

Independent candidate Erik Abildgaard – white male with grey hair and glasses wearing a blue and white ball cap and grey shirt with black collar.

Independent candidate Erik Abildgaard

Six candidates are vying for your vote on May 29, hoping to be Livingstone-Macleod’s next MLA. All were invited to submit a piece outlining their election platform for publication in Shootin’ the Breeze.

It has been said that I am coming out of the starting gate as an independent candidate in this Alberta election with a lot of fire in my belly.

I know I stand in the gap. I know I will state truths many others won’t.

I want the return of freedom as an inalienable right and believe my views are widely shared among Albertans. People are sick and tired. They’ve been deceived and manipulated, possibly even pulled into an unconscious state of compliance.

 

 

We work hard. We’re not getting ahead. Too many injustices. Too many imbalances.

It’s time to sort a few things out and it’s time for people to stop believing the lies.

Freedom is at the heart of my message. We are born free but we’ve been told we are enslaved. I am one of many thousands of freedom fighters emerging with a timely wake-up call for citizens.

 

Ad for Creekview Dental Hygiene clinic in Pincher Creek

 

I advocate for freedom as follows:

—Removal of corporation slave name.

—Operate with sovereign identity without interference.

—Sovereign veto power. Sovereign can disallow government act or bill.

—Removal of all WEF members in legislature.

—The WEF membership is unconstitutional under section 31.2 of British North America Act to remain in parliament or senate of any foreign entity.

—Removal of all taxes.

—Sovereign fair share of resources.

—Vaccinated and unvaccinated must have full access to medical treatment of their choice. Refusal of any hospital or medical facility results in the loss of licence to operate in Alberta.

 

 

—Government cannot interfere with businesses without cause and evidence.

—No longer can a person be terminated without cause.

—Future vaccines must be vetted by qualified doctors, not by appointed doctors. Businesses cannot interfere with outcome, i.e. Bill Gates/Moderna.

—Access to dental care by all sovereign and pricing must be balanced via Alberta GDP. Cannot price gouge.

I was born and raised in Alberta and reside in Nanton. I am a voice of freedom.

 

Albertans head to the polls Monday, May 29.

Advanced voting is open May 23 to 27.

For voter information, including polling stations, see pages 9 to 11.

View Crowsnest Pass election forum videos here: Part 1, Part 2

Individual candidate statements:

Dylin Hauser – Alberta Liberal Party

Kevin Van Tighem – Alberta New Democratic Party

Kevin Todd – Alberta Party

Erik Abildgaard – Independent

Corrie Toone – Independence Party of Alberta

Chelsae Petrovic – United Conservative Party

 

 

Related articles:

Livingstone-Macleod Candidates Make Last Appeals At Crowsnest Pass Forum

‘Not Notley’ Sign To Come Down, Says MD Of Pincher Creek

Scheduling Conflicts Derail Livingstone-Macleod Election Forum In Pincher Creek

Pincher Creek Health-Care Forum Draws Large Audience

UCP Candidate Calls Out Heart Attack Survivors

Claresholm Politician Enters UCP Nomination Race For Livingstone-Macleod

Read more Livingstone-Macleod articles

 

Alberta Party candidate Kevin Todd – while man with short dark hair wearing a light pink shirt and light blue blazer

Alberta Party candidate Kevin Todd

Six candidates are vying for your vote on May 29, hoping to be Livingstone-Macleod’s next MLA. All were invited to submit a piece outlining their election platform for publication in Shootin’ the Breeze.

Nanton has been home all my life. I’ve married, raised my family and enjoyed a great working career in Livingstone-Macleod, and continue to do so. I work to keep this a place where others can enjoy the same opportunities that I have, for generations to come.

To that end, the Alberta Party will not have a whip. My vote will be your vote. It will always reflect the wishes of the Livingstone-Macleod constituents, not the party, because I represent you first.

The Alberta Party is centred. It does not cater to the right or to the left; it maintains a steady stride down the middle, responding to the needs and issues of everyone, not just special-interest groups. I know, all politicians say the same thing — but the Alberta Party allows its MLAs to represent the people first.

 

 

The Alberta Party platform promotes Alberta and Albertans.

The Alberta Party recognizes that Alberta is an oil and gas province. We also know that we are environmental stewards and we need to preserve this beautiful province for future generations. Moderation at the centre allows us to do that.

The Alberta Party will ensure Albertans receive the education they deserve. The Alberta Party will freeze funding for private and charter schools, and will adopt class-size recommendations: kindergarten to Grade 3, 17; grades 4 to 6, 23; grades 7 to 9, 25; grades 10 to 12, 27. Plus, in collaboration with stakeholders, including teachers and students, the party will create a non-partisan curriculum based on best practices.

 

 

The Alberta Party recognizes that every community is different and has different issues. We will address these issues on a community-by-community basis. There is no one easy fix for all. Housing, education, seniors, health care and the economy are all specific to your community.

These are just a few of the planks in the Alberta Party platform. It’s time for change.

We need to get back to fighting for something, and no longer against everyone.

Consider the Alberta Party. You won’t be disappointed.

 

Albertans head to the polls Monday, May 29.

Advanced voting is open May 23 to 27.

For voter information, including polling stations, see pages 9 to 11.

View Crowsnest Pass election forum videos here: Part 1, Part 2

Individual candidate statements:

Dylin Hauser – Alberta Liberal Party

Kevin Van Tighem – Alberta New Democratic Party

Kevin Todd – Alberta Party

Erik Abildgaard – Independent

Corrie Toone – Independence Party of Alberta

Chelsae Petrovic – United Conservative Party

 

 

Related articles:

Livingstone-Macleod Candidates Make Last Appeals At Crowsnest Pass Forum

‘Not Notley’ Sign To Come Down, Says MD Of Pincher Creek

Scheduling Conflicts Derail Livingstone-Macleod Election Forum In Pincher Creek

Pincher Creek Health-Care Forum Draws Large Audience

UCP Candidate Calls Out Heart Attack Survivors

Claresholm Politician Enters UCP Nomination Race For Livingstone-Macleod

Read more Livingstone-Macleod articles

 

NDP candidate Kevin Van Tighem – smiling white man with short grey hair wearing a grey dress shirt

Alberta NDP candidate Kevin Van Tighem

Six candidates are vying for your vote on May 29, hoping to be Livingstone-Macleod’s next MLA. All were invited to submit a piece outlining their election platform for publication in Shootin’ the Breeze.

Until last year, I was always non-partisan and was never involved with politics.

But that ended when I saw what the UCP was doing to the province I love and call home. 

I started my campaign about a month before being appointed as the NDP candidate for Livingstone-Macleod at a nomination meeting last November.

Since then, I’ve had conversations with people on over 2,000 doorsteps in Coleman, Fort Macleod, Beaver Mines, Pincher Creek, Blackie and High River. When counting the conversations volunteers on our team have had, we’re well past 5,000 doors.

 

 

Each conversation has been fascinating, meaningful, and even heartbreaking. After more than three decades of working with neighbours on what matters here, I thought I knew Livingstone-Macleod.

I now realize I had barely scratched the surface.

I’ve talked to people who’ve lost their family doctor and can’t get primary care. The severe challenges facing rural health care under the UCP have forced people to turn to emergency rooms instead of walk-in clinics or doctors’ offices.

I’ve heard about expectant mothers driving to Calgary on winter roads for maternity care because Fort Macleod and Pincher Creek can no longer have it.

On the other side, doctors have told me they are burnt out and frustrated. They’re too busy to take on more patients. A nurse told me she and her whole team are in counselling after three years of constant work, overtime and pressure — all while the UCP government disrespects them.

 

Pig roast at wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

I spoke with an elderly woman who has to stretch her pension further to keep up with her rising mortgage and utility bills. Now, she has to rely on the food bank. She used to donate before the UCP took the caps off utility rates. Now she’s a client. 

Doorway after doorway, I’ve learned of our communities’ challenges. It’s been sobering. It’s also been inspiring.

I’m more determined than ever to represent the people in my community and make sure a trustworthy government hears these concerns and acts.

Politics has to be about more than partisanship and political games; it has to be a sincere offer and commitment to deliver a better future.

That’s why my team and I have been to every community in our riding. It’s why we started hosting meet-and-greet sessions in the winter and have gone to school meetings, health workshops, trade fairs and countless other gatherings. 

 

 

We are in this for our neighbours and their families.

And what we’re seeing is more Alberta NDP supporters. Almost a third have told me they are conservatives but cannot vote, in good conscience, for what the UCP has become under Danielle Smith’s chaotic leadership. 

Last November, I chose to fight for a better future for Alberta by stepping out of retirement to run for the party that puts people first: the Alberta NDP. I am running with a real leader who cares and who’s focused on what matters to Albertans: Rachel Notley.

I want people to know I’ve done my homework, and you can rely on me. I am in this for Livingstone-Macleod and the families, communities and land we all cherish.

 

Albertans head to the polls Monday, May 29.

Advanced voting is open May 23 to 27.

For voter information, including polling stations, see pages 9 to 11.

View Crowsnest Pass election forum videos here: Part 1, Part 2

Individual candidate statements:

Dylin Hauser – Alberta Liberal Party

Kevin Van Tighem – Alberta New Democratic Party

Kevin Todd – Alberta Party

Erik Abildgaard – Independent

Corrie Toone – Independence Party of Alberta

Chelsae Petrovic – United Conservative Party

 

 

Related articles:

Livingstone-Macleod Candidates Make Last Appeals At Crowsnest Pass Forum

‘Not Notley’ Sign To Come Down, Says MD Of Pincher Creek

Scheduling Conflicts Derail Livingstone-Macleod Election Forum In Pincher Creek

Pincher Creek Health-Care Forum Draws Large Audience

UCP Candidate Calls Out Heart Attack Survivors

Claresholm Politician Enters UCP Nomination Race For Livingstone-Macleod

Read more Livingstone-Macleod articles

 

Dylin Hauser headshot – man with very short dark hair wearing a grey shirt with a brick wall background

Alberta Liberal Party candidate Dylin Hauser

Six candidates are vying for your vote on May 29, hoping to be Livingstone-Macleod’s next MLA. All were invited to submit a piece outlining their election platform for publication in Shootin’ the Breeze.

For the last 12 years, I have committed myself to raising my four children — four- and eight-year-old boys, a 10-year-old daughter, and my oldest, a 12-year-old son, who has been a huge influence on my campaign in the last election and on my life. I’m far from perfect, but like all of us, I do the best that I can for them.

Much of my children’s life I spent away working on a drilling rig. For the better part of seven years I experienced tremendous industrial highs, torturous lows and constant negotiating with myself over how much time away from my family was too much.

Over time, however, my values changed. Upon the passing of my biological father in 2019, the personal sacrifice away from my family lost its purpose. My son’s mental health needs that began to show during my 2019 campaign required more support.

 

 

I made the decision to leave the rigs for a family life I struggled with missing and felt was passing me by. Kids grow up fast, and to me, soccer practice wasn’t something I wanted to miss any more. Life has no guarantees.

Despite the significant financial cost of this change, for me the decision has been worthwhile. But I will forever respect those who stay in that life — we all make sacrifices in our different ways.

Politics to me isn’t just about policy announcements claiming fixes for all things that seem to never get fixed. I heard so many hurtful things from politicians on the left and right as a rig worker, and so many empty promises at making Alberta better.

It’s easy to stand in front of a microphone and say I’m going to hire 4,000 teachers and protect the environment. It’s easy to use a powerful word like “freedom,” and make it mean whatever I want to gain access to the legislature.

 

Ad for Ascent Dental in Pincher Creek

 

I present myself with personal stories because I believe that is what is truly missing, keeping us stuck from being able to make truly impactful changes at a government level.

Lately as a voter it seems we expect perfection in our politics, yet it’s the struggles we experience where we truly learn how to make something better. I have flaws, I have failures, and it’s in them I’ve learned what I feel can bring meaningful change to the lives of everyday Albertans.

I understand the need for economic development, but, when I say no more coal in our mountains, or a catchy phrase like “mountains not mines,” then I have to equally respect the consequences of that decision as well.

I’ll say it now, I am mountains not mines, but I would be responsible for all of us in Livingstone-Macleod, so I need to concentrate on helping our communities impacted by no-coal legislation to keep their community alive. I feel this impact on livelihoods, on heritage, isn’t being respected enough.

 

 

I am running in this election because I am passionate about bringing options to voters. Lack of choice benefits those who seek power, and not the voter they will be responsible to. I cannot promise every move I make will please you, but I promise I will think through every decision and I will be more than happy to be held accountable, to explain my rationale.

I will be here to answer to my critics and share any good news I can bring. There will be no MIA MLA if I am blessed with representing us in Edmonton. Our vote is powerful. If your decision of who to vote for is as simple as a party name, then how hard does someone actually have to work at being accountable to you?

My name is Dylin Hauser. I campaigned here in 2019 and my name is on the ballot here again in 2023. I am running as an Alberta Liberal. I am running being proud of my time in our oil patch. I am Albertan.

 

Albertans head to the polls Monday, May 29.

Advanced voting is open May 23 to 27.

For voter information, including polling stations, see pages 9 to 11.

View Crowsnest Pass election forum videos here: Part 1, Part 2

Individual candidate statements:

Dylin Hauser – Alberta Liberal Party

Kevin Van Tighem – Alberta New Democratic Party

Kevin Todd – Alberta Party

Erik Abildgaard – Independent

Corrie Toone – Independence Party of Alberta

Chelsae Petrovic – United Conservative Party

 

 

Related articles:

Livingstone-Macleod Candidates Make Last Appeals At Crowsnest Pass Forum

‘Not Notley’ Sign To Come Down, Says MD Of Pincher Creek

Scheduling Conflicts Derail Livingstone-Macleod Election Forum In Pincher Creek

Pincher Creek Health-Care Forum Draws Large Audience

UCP Candidate Calls Out Heart Attack Survivors

Claresholm Politician Enters UCP Nomination Race For Livingstone-Macleod

Read more Livingstone-Macleod articles

 

Independence Party of Alberta candidate Corrie Toone. White man with short reddish-brown hair, moustache and beard, leaning against a blue truck

Indpendence Party candidate Corrie Toone

Six candidates are vying for your vote on May 29, hoping to be Livingstone-Macleod’s next MLA. All were invited to submit a piece outlining their election platform for publication in Shootin’ the Breeze.

I want to start off by saying why I decided to run for MLA.

It’s been a long time since politicians have been public servants. It seems to me every four years they come around making promises they don’t ever keep.

We have a lot of problems in this province, country and world right now. I think we can all agree the performance of the government, left or right, has not been in the best interest of Albertans or Canadians.

Parents’ and guardians’ rights to make decisions for their own children will be respected and honoured.

 

 

Back to basics, remove identity politics from schools no more indoctrinations. Get back to the basics, foundational education.

Defend Alberta’s business from crippling government interference. 

The broken Alberta health-care service, identify the dysfunctional and wasteful problems in AHS.

Elected MLAs will not be affiliated with any global organizations, including WHO, WEF and the UN.

Fair tax system pays no personal taxes on the first $30,000. Maximum 25 per flat tax above that.

End equalization. Six hundred billion dollars have been taken from Alberta in the last 60 years, about $30 billion annually.

 

Albertans head to the polls Monday, May 29.

Advanced voting is open May 23 to 27.

For voter information, including polling stations, see pages 9 to 11.

View Crowsnest Pass election forum videos here: Part 1, Part 2

Individual candidate statements:

Dylin Hauser – Alberta Liberal Party

Kevin Van Tighem – Alberta New Democratic Party

Kevin Todd – Alberta Party

Erik Abildgaard – Independent

Corrie Toone – Independence Party of Alberta

Chelsae Petrovic – United Conservative Party

 

 

Related articles:

Livingstone-Macleod Candidates Make Last Appeals At Crowsnest Pass Forum

‘Not Notley’ Sign To Come Down, Says MD Of Pincher Creek

Scheduling Conflicts Derail Livingstone-Macleod Election Forum In Pincher Creek

Pincher Creek Health-Care Forum Draws Large Audience

UCP Candidate Calls Out Heart Attack Survivors

Claresholm Politician Enters UCP Nomination Race For Livingstone-Macleod

Read more Livingstone-Macleod articles

 

Alberta premier Danielle Smith, smiling woman with shoulder-length dark brown hair

Smith promises UCP is committed to preserving public health care

Premier Danielle Smith has issued a “public health guarantee” that, if re-elected, her United Conservative government won’t leave Albertans paying for medical treatment, including visits to doctors.

Speaking Tuesday in Sherwood Park, Smith said, “I want to be clear: under the UCP’s public health-care guarantee, we are committing to all Albertans that under no circumstances will any Albertan ever have to pay out-of-pocket to see their family doctor or to get the medical treatment they need. And it means that a UCP government, under my leadership, will not delist any medical services or prescriptions now covered by Alberta Health Insurance. No exceptions.” 

The United Conservatives’ 2023 budget includes $24.5 billion for Alberta’s public health-care system — roughly a billion dollars more than spending forecasted in 2023-23, according to budget highlights published on the Government of Alberta’s website. 

 

 

A 2021 public policy paper written by Smith and published by the University of Calgary makes it clear that Smith was open to other ideas two years before she won the UCP leadership race last fall. 

“We can no longer afford universal social programs that are 100 per cent paid by taxpayers,” Smith wrote in her paper, entitled “Alberta’s Key Challenges And Opportunities.” 

Under the subheading User Fees, Smith specified that Albertans should pay for doctor visits out of personal health spending accounts to be subsidized by the province.

“If the government funded the account at $375 a year, that’s the equivalent of 10 trips to a GP, so there can be no argument that this would compromise access on the basis of ability to pay,” Smith wrote. 

Smith went on to insist that any redefinition of universality “must mean that no one is denied care when they need it and no one should face bankruptcy because of medical bills. Full stop.”

UCP candidate Chelsae Petrovic – smiling woman with long, straight, light-brown hair, wearing a grey sweater

Claresholm politician enters UCP nomination race for Livingstone-Macleod

Chelsae Petrovic, a licensed practical nurse outside of town chambers, told Shootin’ the Breeze on Jan. 31 that she wants to return provincial politics to its grassroots within the riding. 

“As politicians, we need to take our orders from and listen to our constituents,” she said. 

She’d been generally uninterested in politics until she decided to run for council in Claresholm in the run-up to its October 2021 civic election. 

Her husband, Cody, suggested that she aim higher, so she went for the mayoral spot and won.

 

Your Dollar Store With More Ad – – Pincher Creek Trade Show

 

“My specialty is advocating for people,” she said, adding that she resolved to run for the UCP’s riding nomination after some heart-wrenching conversations with local moms and dads last Christmas. 

“When I heard from parents who said they had to choose between buying presents for their children and filling up their gas tank … that’s what put me over the edge.” 

She wants to run under the UCP banner because, in her words, “I’m a mom; a wife; a Christian. I resonate more with the party’s traditional values.”

Petrovic said Premier Danielle Smith needs MLAs who will hold her to account while supporting her policy initiatives, including and especially Smith’s controversial Sovereign Alberta Within a United Canada Act.

 

MD of Pincher Creek Ad – – Pincher Creek Trade Show

 

“I truly believe that’s a good thing for Alberta,” she told the Breeze

As an LPN at Claresholm General Hospital and the emergency department in Fort Macleod, Petrovic said she “lives and breathes” health care. Fixing health care has to be about listening to front-line nurses and doctors and getting them what they need to stay in their jobs, she said. 

Petrovic said she planned to submit her finalized application to the UCP’s constituency association in Livingstone-Macleod within the week.

She will have to contend with a number of other hopeful nominees, including Don Whalen of nearby Parkland. 

 

Ascent Dental Ad – – Pincher Creek Trade Show

 

The UCP reopened riding nominations on Jan. 26, roughly two months after the party disqualified Nadine Wellwood over her social media posts wherein she compared Canada’s Covid-19 measures to public policy in Nazi Germany. 

The party will close nominations in the riding Feb. 9, with the contest to be decided sometime in March, Petrovic said.

 

Wild Developments Ad – – Pincher Creek Trade Show

 

 

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