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Pincher Creek’s go-to source
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More than a news website or weekly print newspaper, Shootin’ the Breeze is your community connection
More than a news website or print newspaper, Shootin’ the Breeze is your community connection
Large B logo for the Brick Pincher Creek with yellow button to view current flyer

My Little Corner: Find your peace

My Little Corner: Find your peace
By Shannon Peace
By Shannon Peace
Shootin’ the Breeze Publisher
Shootin’ the Breeze Publisher
January 19, 2024
January 19, 2024
A year ago I would have seen this as a sunset because I looked forward to the end of the day. Now, I see a beautiful sunrise fuelled by possibilities.
A year ago I would have seen this as a sunset because I looked forward to the end of the day. Now, I see a beautiful sunrise fuelled by possibilities.
IMAGE: Jaiden Panchyshyn
Sunrise or sunset? Which do you see?
IMAGE: Jaiden Panchyshyn
Sunrise or sunset? Which do you see?

I have a T-shirt with the phrase “find your peace” written in script on the shoulder. It was a must-have purchase because the sentiment spoke to me and used my last name.

Many people chase peace and some find it.

I am one of them.

Putting these words to paper is a reminder to me, and perhaps to others, that peace exists but also pulls disappearing acts at times. It can often be found again.

Peace on an individual level might focus on finding tranquility, while on a global level, it refers to a time without war.

World peace seems to always be just out of reach. The sun rises and sets as conflicts rage, While we observe and shake our heads about man’s inhumanity to man, hope for peace persists.

For many engaged in war, sunset represents surviving another day and sunrise means facing it all over again. How tragic it must be to wake up only to say good morning day of battle.

Personal peace is individual. What I find fulfilling might be something you abhor and vice versa.

 

Text over a glass of beer and bingo cards on ad for Lions TV Bingo at Oldman River Brewing in Lundbreck

 

What people do with peace varies among us as well — some enjoy disturbing it while others seek to capture it.

If you’re lucky, you’ll connect with someone who shares your definition of peace. For five years I did just that with the man who changed my name to Peace. We both found humour in that (and he was a fan of my T-shirt).

After he passed away before Christmas 2023, I was stuck in the sunset. I often dreaded sunrise and preferred to lurk just a little longer in the dark. Days were hard.

We believed we were prepared for Jim’s death after a terminal cancer diagnosis, but I had no idea how unprepared I was. The experience has given me a new perspective on loss and grief, and the impact they have.

Regular readers noticed the lack of editorials. My Little Corner appeared only sporadically because my brain seemed to have lost the capacity to create anything meaningful. I made errors and dropped a number of balls and, as one used to high achievement, I felt quite useless at times.

I tiptoed from the sunset into the dark on occasion and even caught glimpses of the light of dawn when possibilities seemed attainable. It took a year to fully leave the comfort of the sunset, travel a bumpy road in the dark and overcome some nightmares. 

 

 

Today, squinting at the brightness, I can again see the beauty in a sunrise. I also have new appreciation for sunsets and the night.

Over the last year, my search for peace never ended; it was the engine that kept me running.

Thank you, dear readers, for allowing me the space to take that journey. I look forward to greeting the day and am excited about returning to writing.

I have peace in the beautiful space I call home and with the family and friends who nourish my soul.

A year ago I would have seen this as a sunset because I looked forward to the end of the day. Now, I can see a beautiful sunrise fuelled by possibilities.

What do you see?

I hope you, too, find your peace.

 

Young girl in multi-coloured jacket and bright pink helmet and ski pants, grins broadly while skating with arms outstretched.

 

Winter sunrise or sunset? What do you see?

 

 

I have a T-shirt with the phrase “find your peace” written in script on the shoulder. It was a must-have purchase because the sentiment spoke to me and used my last name.

Many people chase peace and some find it.

I am one of them.

Putting these words to paper is a reminder to me, and perhaps to others, that peace exists but also pulls disappearing acts at times. It can often be found again.

Peace on an individual level might focus on finding tranquility, while on a global level, it refers to a time without war.

World peace seems to always be just out of reach. The sun rises and sets as conflicts rage, While we observe and shake our heads about man’s inhumanity to man, hope for peace persists.

For many engaged in war, sunset represents surviving another day and sunrise means facing it all over again. How tragic it must be to wake up only to say good morning day of battle.

Personal peace is individual. What I find fulfilling might be something you abhor and vice versa.

 

Large B logo for the Brick Pincher Creek with yellow button to view current flyer

 

What people do with peace varies among us as well — some enjoy disturbing it while others seek to capture it.

If you’re lucky, you’ll connect with someone who shares your definition of peace. For five years I did just that with the man who changed my name to Peace. We both found humour in that (and he was a fan of my T-shirt).

After he passed away before Christmas 2023, I was stuck in the sunset. I often dreaded sunrise and preferred to lurk just a little longer in the dark. Days were hard.

We believed we were prepared for Jim’s death after a terminal cancer diagnosis, but I had no idea how unprepared I was. The experience has given me a new perspective on loss and grief, and the impact they have.

Regular readers noticed the lack of editorials. My Little Corner appeared only sporadically because my brain seemed to have lost the capacity to create anything meaningful. I made errors and dropped a number of balls and, as one used to high achievement, I felt quite useless at times.

I tiptoed from the sunset into the dark on occasion and even caught glimpses of the light of dawn when possibilities seemed attainable. It took a year to fully leave the comfort of the sunset, travel a bumpy road in the dark and overcome some nightmares. 

 

 

Today, squinting at the brightness, I can again see the beauty in a sunrise. I also have new appreciation for sunsets and the night.

Over the last year, my search for peace never ended; it was the engine that kept me running.

Thank you, dear readers, for allowing me the space to take that journey. I look forward to greeting the day and am excited about returning to writing.

I have peace in the beautiful space I call home and with the family and friends who nourish my soul.

A year ago I would have seen this as a sunset because I looked forward to the end of the day. Now, I can see a beautiful sunrise fuelled by possibilities.

What do you see?

I hope you, too, find your peace.

 

Bottle of Huckleberry Tea Liqueur against purple background on an ad for Lost Things Distillery in Pincher Creek.

 

Winter sunrise or sunset? What do you see?

 

 

Shelves of bottled liquor in an ad for Town & Country Liquor Store in Pincher Creek
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