Skip to main content

Pincher Creek’s go-to source for local news and events

Pincher Creek’s go-to source
for local news and events

More than a news website or weekly print newspaper, Shootin’ the Breeze is your community connection
More than a news website or print newspaper, Shootin’ the Breeze is your community connection
Large B logo for the Brick Pincher Creek with yellow button to view current flyer

Geminid meteor shower expected to light up the night sky

Geminid meteor shower expected to light up the night sky
By Theodora Macleod, Local Journalism Initiative, Lethbridge Herald
By Theodora Macleod, Local Journalism Initiative, Lethbridge Herald
December 13, 2023
December 13, 2023
For those who like to keep an eye on the sky, the Geminid meteor shower expected tonight and into the morning hours should provide a show.
For those who like to keep an eye on the sky, the Geminid meteor shower expected tonight and into the morning hours should provide a show.
IMAGE: Asim Patel, Wikimedia Commons
Geminids Meteor Shower in northern hemisphere
IMAGE: Asim Patel, Wikimedia Commons
Geminids Meteor Shower in northern hemisphere

For those who like to keep an eye on the sky, the Geminid meteor shower expected to take place this evening and into the morning hours of Thursday should be quite the show.

One of the rare meteor showers that doesn’t originate from a comet, the Geminids – named for the constellation Gemini from which the meteors appear to originate – is said to be caused by 3200 Phaethon, an object that astronomers suspect is a Palladian asteroid.

While much is currently unknown about the Geminids, the Japanese space agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency plans to launch a mission in 2025, called Destiny+, which will gather samples of the rock dust from 3200 Phaethon.

“The Geminids were first observed in the 1800s and they were not very prominent … but they’ve actually grown in magnitude over the decades, and now they are very reliable,” says Perry Savey of the Lethbridge Astronomy Society.

 

Pump bottles of colourful, natural soaps on ad for Lynden House Market in Pincher Creek

 

Long before the Geminids were visible, Blackfoot people saw great significance in the sky and celestial activity. William Singer III (Api’soomaahka) says that meteor showers can act as reminders in Blackfoot culture of the connection to the stars and the cosmos.

He describes learning “stories of our great-great ancestors who were taken to the heavens and were brought back down in the form of a meteorite. So, wherever they landed they would a build a structure, either a circle of rocks or a pillar.”

Singer says there are many stories and teachings involving meteor showers and the skies they can even be represented on the tipi and are recorded on the Winter Counts which track events using symbols and images.

“When you see a meteorite and it disappears, it’s up there. It had that choice to come down, but it went back up. They don’t make it down unless they have a purpose,” says Singer.

Whether the meteor shower is just a sight to behold or a symbol of deeper spirituality, those interested in viewing the event tonight are advised to find a place away from the city lights and avoid phone screens for at least 30 minutes.

The activity is said to be more visible as the night goes on so Savey advises anyone keeping an eye out to have patience and use a night sky app.

 

 

White car surrounded by auto parts on Pincher Creek Bumper to Bumper ad

 

 

For those who like to keep an eye on the sky, the Geminid meteor shower expected to take place this evening and into the morning hours of Thursday should be quite the show.

One of the rare meteor showers that doesn’t originate from a comet, the Geminids – named for the constellation Gemini from which the meteors appear to originate – is said to be caused by 3200 Phaethon, an object that astronomers suspect is a Palladian asteroid.

While much is currently unknown about the Geminids, the Japanese space agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency plans to launch a mission in 2025, called Destiny+, which will gather samples of the rock dust from 3200 Phaethon.

“The Geminids were first observed in the 1800s and they were not very prominent … but they’ve actually grown in magnitude over the decades, and now they are very reliable,” says Perry Savey of the Lethbridge Astronomy Society.

 

Pincher Creek Chamber of Commerce notice of annual general meeting on brightly coloured background

 

Long before the Geminids were visible, Blackfoot people saw great significance in the sky and celestial activity. William Singer III (Api’soomaahka) says that meteor showers can act as reminders in Blackfoot culture of the connection to the stars and the cosmos.

He describes learning “stories of our great-great ancestors who were taken to the heavens and were brought back down in the form of a meteorite. So, wherever they landed they would a build a structure, either a circle of rocks or a pillar.”

Singer says there are many stories and teachings involving meteor showers and the skies they can even be represented on the tipi and are recorded on the Winter Counts which track events using symbols and images.

“When you see a meteorite and it disappears, it’s up there. It had that choice to come down, but it went back up. They don’t make it down unless they have a purpose,” says Singer.

Whether the meteor shower is just a sight to behold or a symbol of deeper spirituality, those interested in viewing the event tonight are advised to find a place away from the city lights and avoid phone screens for at least 30 minutes.

The activity is said to be more visible as the night goes on so Savey advises anyone keeping an eye out to have patience and use a night sky app.

 

Bottle of Huckleberry Tea Liqueur against purple background on an ad for Lost Things Distillery in Pincher Creek.

 

View of women's clothing store, at Emerald & Ash Clothing in Crowsnest Pass.

 

 

Leave a Reply
Camille Kalveram, young professional woman with long blonde hair, on Vision Credit Union ad
Young girl in multi-coloured jacket and bright pink helmet and ski pants, grins broadly while skating with arms outstretched.
Solar panel on ad for Riteline Electric in Pincher Creek