Skip to main content

Pincher Creek’s go-to source for local news and events

Pincher Creek’s go-to source
for local news and events

More than a news website or weekly print newspaper, Shootin’ the Breeze is your community connection
More than a news website or print newspaper, Shootin’ the Breeze is your community connection
You're in good hands – animated ad for National Newspaper Week

Celebrate 100 years of John Deere Model D at Heritage Acres

Celebrate 100 years of John Deere Model D at Heritage Acres
By Jillanna Hammond
By Jillanna Hammond
Shootin’ the Breeze Community Reporter
Shootin’ the Breeze Community Reporter
July 19, 2023
July 19, 2023
The John Deere Model D became one of the most successful tractors of its era, providing a foundation for the future triumphs of the company as a leader in agricultural equipment manufacturing. 
The John Deere Model D became one of the most successful tractors of its era, providing a foundation for the future triumphs of the company as a leader in agricultural equipment manufacturing. 
IMAGE: Jillanna Hammond
IMAGE: Jillanna Hammond

Heritage Acres Farm Museum is celebrating the 100-year anniversary of the John Deere Model D tractor at its Annual Show this weekend. The Model D, released in 1923, was the first piece of machinery to be built under the John Deere name. 

The museum is the home to around 10 Model Ds and Ken Harness, president of the Oldman River Antique Equipment and Threshing Club, has one of his own. 

“In 1939, my dad bought this tractor brand new and it’s been in the family ever since,” Ken said, tapping the hood. 

 

Man in sleeveless plaid shirt, jeans and a hat stands beside an old, green John Deere tractor
Ken Harness poses with his family tractor, a 1939 John Deere Model D, near the sawmill at Heritage Acres Farm Museum. Don’t judge a tractor by its paint job, because this beauty still runs like it’s 1960. Photo by Jillanna Hammond

 

Display of fall clothing at at Emerald & Ash Clothing in Crowsnest Pass.

 

In 1836, before the time of the tractor,  a humble blacksmith from Vermont named John Deere fabricated a hardy steel plow that made it easier for farmers to manoeuvre soil. A year later he started up his own business, Deere and Company, building plows for farmers near and far.

By 1892 another inventor, John Froelich, built the first gasoline-powered tractor, starting up the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company. In 1918 Deere and Company bought the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company, and tinkered with Waterloo Boy designs until 1923.

Introduced  in 1923 and produced until 1953, the John Deere Model D tractor was a revolutionary machine in the agriculture industry. Based on the Waterloo Boy models, the Model D was a versatile, reliable and affordable two-cylinder row-crop tractor. It became one of the most successful tractors of its era, providing a foundation for the future triumphs of John Deere as a leader in agricultural equipment manufacturing. 

During its 30-year circuit, the Model D received numerous updates and improvements, with variations in features to suit different farming needs.

The development of tractors caused a shift from livestock-based power to mechanical, allowing farmers to increase their efficiency and productivity while reducing the need for manual labour. The John Deere Model D was a groundbreaking tractor in its time and remains an iconic piece of history at Heritage Acres Farm Museum.

Don’t miss your chance to check out these legendary tractors during this weekend’s Annual Show. Event information is available here.

Heritage Acres Farm Museum is celebrating the 100-year anniversary of the John Deere Model D tractor at its Annual Show this weekend. The Model D, released in 1923, was the first piece of machinery to be built under the John Deere name. 

The museum is the home to around 10 Model Ds and Ken Harness, president of the Oldman River Antique Equipment and Threshing Club, has one of his own. 

“In 1939, my dad bought this tractor brand new and it’s been in the family ever since,” Ken said, tapping the hood. 

 

Man in sleeveless plaid shirt, jeans and a hat stands beside an old, green John Deere tractor
Ken Harness poses with his family tractor, a 1939 John Deere Model D, near the sawmill at Heritage Acres Farm Museum. Don’t judge a tractor by its paint job, because this beauty still runs like it’s 1960. Photo by Jillanna Hammond

 

Gift certificates on ad for Blairmore IGA

 

In 1836, before the time of the tractor,  a humble blacksmith from Vermont named John Deere fabricated a hardy steel plow that made it easier for farmers to manoeuvre soil. A year later he started up his own business, Deere and Company, building plows for farmers near and far.

By 1892 another inventor, John Froelich, built the first gasoline-powered tractor, starting up the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company. In 1918 Deere and Company bought the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company, and tinkered with Waterloo Boy designs until 1923.

Introduced  in 1923 and produced until 1953, the John Deere Model D tractor was a revolutionary machine in the agriculture industry. Based on the Waterloo Boy models, the Model D was a versatile, reliable and affordable two-cylinder row-crop tractor. It became one of the most successful tractors of its era, providing a foundation for the future triumphs of John Deere as a leader in agricultural equipment manufacturing. 

During its 30-year circuit, the Model D received numerous updates and improvements, with variations in features to suit different farming needs.

The development of tractors caused a shift from livestock-based power to mechanical, allowing farmers to increase their efficiency and productivity while reducing the need for manual labour. The John Deere Model D was a groundbreaking tractor in its time and remains an iconic piece of history at Heritage Acres Farm Museum.

Don’t miss your chance to check out these legendary tractors during this weekend’s Annual Show. Event information is available here.

Leave a Reply
Five Lampe Berger fragrance bottles on Christmas gift advertisement for Crockets Trading Company in Crowsnest Pass
Pump bottles of colourful, natural soaps on ad for Lynden House Market in Pincher Creek
Shelves of bottled liquor in an ad for Town & Country Liquor Store in Pincher Creek