Skip to main content

Author: William Cockerell

William Cockerell attained his journalism degree from Concordia University and started his first journalism role at Shootin' the Breeze in 2022.
Young man in blue shirt, black hat and jeans helps girl in pink helmet learn to skateboard

Shootin’ the Breeze – May 10, 2023

A new skate of mind

Skateboard enthusiasts like Micky Painter flocked to Pincher Creek Skatepark on April 29 for free lessons, provided by the Southwest Alberta Skateboard Society and Boarderline Skateboard and Snowboard Shop.

Group of young football players pose at spring camp

Mustangs to host Stampeders Spring Football Camp

From April 28 to 29, Pincher Creek Mustangs Football will host its annual Stampeders Spring Football Camp, for southern Alberta’s aspiring young players, at Matthew Halton football field.

Athletes from grades 3 to 11 are invited to register for the camp, where Tre Roberson and Derek Wiggan of the CFL’s Calgary Stampeders will run drills and teach the fundamentals of football.

Players will be divided into groups based on age and experience. Younger athletes will learn basic stances and how to catch and throw the ball. Bantams and senior-level players will focus more on learning various plays and the intricacies of the game.

Faith Zachar, president of the Mustangs, has been running camps such as these for about 25 years. 

 

Aerial view of the Cowley Lions Campground on the Castle River in southwestern Alberta

 

“These camps teach the kids about football, but it’s also a chance to build their confidence and make them understand that there are opportunities to get into the CFL or university football if they work hard and learn the game,” Faith says.

She notes Mustangs alumnus Cord Delinte as a prime example of a player using what he learned at camps like the one coming up to go on to greater opportunities. 

Cord went on to have a great five-year football career, primarily as a defensive back, at the University of Regina. He received multiple all-star nods during his varsity career, and was even invited to the 2019 CFL Western Regional Combine.

Faith adds that kids will gain not just a greater understanding of football from the camp, but also bonds and life lessons that will follow them forever.

 

 

“I think football is vital to small communities,” she says. “The camaraderie, the teamwork and the friendships that these kids will develop are things that will stick with them the rest of their lives.”

The camp costs $75 per child for the full two days, or $50 if a child wishes to attend only one of the two days. Registration will be accepted right up to the day of the camp.

Each participating athlete is expected to take a water bottle, cleats and runners to the camp.

To preregister or for more information, you can contact Faith Zachar at 403-627-7751 or faithzachar@hotmail.com, or Shannon Schoening at 403-795-5710 or uc6ranch@gmail.com.

Man speaks into a microphone while referring to results of a climate risk study projected on the wall

Climate impact assessment results presented at open house

Last Thursday, the Town and MD of Pincher Creek hosted an open house to share the results of their climate risk assessment and to inform the community of climate projections and potential risks facing the region. 

The goal was to share the results with locals and obtain feedback on the risks that were identified, as well as adaptation measures for those risks. Feedback will be used to help develop a climate adaptation plan for the area.

According to Tristan Walker, municipal energy project lead for Pincher Creek, the open house was a great success.

“There is a wealth of knowledge within our community, and to develop these plans to the best of their ability, I think we need to be taking advantage of the knowledge that is within the community,” he says.

The open house began with a presentation of the findings from the climate risk assessment, including high-risk climate vulnerabilities for the area and climate projections over the course of this century.

Jeff Zukiwsky of All One Sky Foundation explained how climate risks were identified, as well as the evaluation criteria and risk level for each climate risk.

 

Ad for Creekview Dental Hygiene clinic in Pincher Creek

 

From there, Zukiwsky gave the floor to Dave Sauchyn of the Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative. Sauchyn presented climate projections and what they look like within the MD.

Locals posed questions during the presentation portion of the open house before sharing thoughts in more depth during an interactive session that followed. 

Community members were encouraged to share their ideas and opinions, either by talking face-to-face with those involved with the assessment or by submitting written recommendations.

According to Walker, water supply shortage, wildfire smoke and wildfire were among the risks that seemed to concern people the most. In other words, anything to do with fire, flooding and drought.

David McIntyre and Monica Field were among the many area residents who attended the meeting. The pair are pleased with the town and MD’s commitment to pre-emptively addressing the climate risks identified. 

“We care passionately about not only the community today, but the community tomorrow, and we’d like to see some kind of legacy planning done that really saves what we consider to be an incredible landscape at our doorstep,” McIntyre said.

 

Ad for Aurora Eggert Coaching in Beaver Mines

 

“It was good and proactive for the MD and the town to be looking at how to adapt to climate change,” added Field.

“Often we’re more inclined to wait for catastrophic weather events and clean them up, rather than trying to develop ways of being more resistant to the damage.”

Like many attending the meeting, Field and McIntyre spoke with presenters and made their own suggestions on how to better adapt to climate risks moving forward.

Both expressed that wildfire and flooding are two of the main risks facing the town and MD, and the pair each had their respective views of how to handle them.

McIntyre noted how reintroducing beavers to creeks and rivers within the MD could significantly help minimize flood risk. The dams would slow the flow of water, in turn delaying and reducing flood peaks farther downstream.

“I see beavers as being colossal with respect to what they can do to bring us back into some state of health,” he said.

 

 

While Field agreed with him about beavers, she also addressed the importance of people examining their personal living situations.

“Each of us has to look at our own home and look for risks. We have to as individuals start trying to do what we can to protect our homes,” she said.

The engagement and knowledge from the public is something that the town and MD’s climate resilience team isn’t overlooking. 

“The attendance was above expectations for sure, and super appreciative of everybody that came out,” Walker says. 

He and his team will review the surveys, suggestions, posters and forms submitted and begin moving forward with a climate adaptation plan based on community feedback and their own research.

For more information and updates on the climate adaptation plan, be sure to visit the Town of Pincher Creek and MD of Pincher Creek No. 9 pages on Facebook, or reach out to Tristan Walker  by email.

Male actor in orange shirt and black pants is laying on the floor with a silly look on his face while being pulled by the arms in different directions by children

Trickster Theatre and students create Stronger Together show

Students and teachers from Coleman’s Horace Allen School co-created a production with professional artists from Trickster Theatre, culminating in a final performance March 31.

Trickster Theatre, a non-profit based in Calgary, offers fun, engaging and effective learning through physical theatre to schools across Alberta. 

Trickster runs with a theme selected by each school, creating shows with students and staff through physical theatre styles. 

Through Trickster’s main residency program, HAS students and teachers worked with a team of professional artists for a full week to create an original show.

“Our theme is Stronger Together, so that’s just about coming together again after Covid and being able to work side by side again,” says Myrna Dembicki, assistant principal at Horace Allen. 

Each class at Horace Allen worked with an artist to figure out what their performance piece would be in the final show.

 

 

“We’ve got themes for each performance piece, from helping animals in the forest, to a wedding disaster in Tunisia, to working with a local fire department,” says Dembicki.

Students worked with the artists to create movement patterns, then developed context around those patterns and created the story and dialogue.

In total, eight classes from kindergarten to Grade 3 and a group of teachers made up the nine performance pieces featured in the show.

“It has been wonderful to have this opportunity to work together again as a school community, strengthening relationships inside the school and wider out into our community,” said Elaine Garner, principal of Horace Allen, in a message in the event program.

While the student and staff performers were the main stars of the week, none of this would have been possible without the parent volunteers who gave their time to help organize and set up the performance.

“An amazing crew of volunteer parents” were on-site throughout the week, “helping unload equipment from vans, making costumes, props and so much more,” Myrna says.

 

Ad for Shadowbar Shepherds Training in Pincher Creek

 

“The volunteers being here really defines our Stronger Together theme that we chose for our performance.”

The residency was made possible through a grant provided by the Alberta Foundation for the Arts. The grant covered 75 per cent of the cost of the residency for the school. Additional funding came from HAS and its school council.

 

Children march while connected to one another by green pool noodles wrapped around their waist
Children have fun with a giant green, fabric tunnel
Male actor in orange shirt and black pants is laying on the floor with a silly look on his face while being pulled by the arms in different directions by children
Kids create a tunnel with coloured hula hoops and one child crawls through it
Woman in hippy outfit sings on stage on the front page of Shootin' the Breeze

March 22, 2023 Issue

Let It Be! rocks the Pass

Taking centre stage during the opening night of Let It Be! A Rock Musical last Friday, Clarissa Manson sings “Strawberry Fields Forever.”

Womens' hands joined in a gesture of comfort

Increased demand for victim services, volunteers needed

Ranchlands Victim Services, the only 24-hour crisis unit in Alberta, is looking for volunteers who can devote time to assisting victims of crime and tragedy with their short-term needs.

In partnership with the RCMP and additional co-partners, RVS provides victims with emotional support, practical assistance and referrals to community resources for continued support. 

According to Shelly-Anne Dennis, executive program manager, the organization has recently experienced increased demand for their services, requiring more volunteers to provide victims with support. 

“We’re seeing more cases of domestic violence and sexual assault, which means a greater need for our services,” she says.

 

Table setting of wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

Volunteers typically go out to crisis calls and may provide court support, accompaniment, transportation and other means of assisting victims.

Supporting the communities of Pincher Creek, Crowsnest Pass, Fort Macleod, Claresholm and Piikani Nation, RVS emphasizes the provision of a co-ordinated, skilled and efficient response to victims of traumatic events. 

“Being able to administer trauma support to victims of crime and tragedy in our community is a very crucial and beneficial service,” Dennis says.

The RCMP often rely on RVS staff and volunteers to provide support to victims and their families, while they focus on potential offenders, particularly in cases of criminal activity.

 

 

Part of the struggle to find volunteers comes with the rigorous background check that each potential volunteer or staff member of RVS has to go through to be accepted.

“You have to pass an enhanced security clearance, which is the same clearance as an RCMP officer, so it’s a very strict background check,” Dennis says

Employees and volunteers of RVS have a level of security clearance that exposes them to police files that they must keep confidential. A thorough background check is crucial in ensuring someone is suited to sign on.

These background checks are meant not only to look for criminal history, but also to look for anything that could affect work credibility or re-traumatize someone who was once a victim themself.

 

 

This could include a recent history of domestic violence, assault or financial stressors.

In time, Dennis hopes RVS can get more volunteers to maintain a full unit to service and support our communities.

“I’m pretty passionate about this job — it isn’t just a job to me. I love helping people and the work I do to help said people,” she says.

“We hope that our work decreases the amount of trauma that people have to go through and that eventually, with the proper help, they could move back into a normal lifestyle sooner.”

If you wish to become a volunteer with RVS, the advocate application is available online at ranchlandsvictimservices.com.

 

Ace of spades card on ad for Chase the Ace at the Pincher Creek Legion

 

 

Local Stories Obituaries Story Idea?

 

 

 

 

Woman with long, dark hair puts oranges into a stand-up cooler at the Pincher Creek Food Centre

New equipment expands capacity for Food Centre

In the midst of a growing need for perishable foods, the Pincher Creek and District Community Food Centre has added two new large deep freezers and two new large stand-up coolers.

The equipment will allow the centre to store and carry more perishable items at its location, while giving those in need a greater variety of quality foods that they can receive.

Acquisition of the new equipment was made possible through the 2022 Capacity Boost Grant from Food Banks Canada, with the food centre receiving $16,800.

The centre was also able to purchase additional equipment needed for the vegetable garden that it tends with the grant money.

The Capacity Boost Grant is meant to help food banks expand its capacity to accept, distribute, grow or safely handle and store perishable and non-perishable items .

“Our board members and volunteers who helped with this worked very hard to make it all come together,” says Alice Wagenaar, a board member and volunteer for the food centre.

“This is all certainly going to make our operation a whole lot better and we’ll be able to provide better-quality food as a result of it.”

Moving forward, the food centre will be able to provide more fresh and frozen food to those within the community suffering from food insecurity and better meet their needs.

In particular, the new storage capacity for frozen foods will allow volunteers to include a greater variety of food items in their food hampers.

“It’s really nice to see the organization moving forward, expanding its capacity and just becoming a solid organization in this community,” says Alice.

The food hamper program runs throughout the year, providing those reaching out in need of food with a hamper once every two weeks.

Now that the food centre possesses the means to store large quantities of frozen and perishable foods, it is looking to run a Fill the Freezer campaign later in the month

The centre will seek to fill the freezers with meat and frozen vegetables from anyone who is in a position to donate food and help the centre provide quality foods.

“Unfortunately, this is a time when food prices are so high, and we’ve certainly had an increased demand,” says Alice.

“We have such a generous community, so we’re hoping if anyone has meat or vegetables to spare, they think about us.”

Keep an eye out on the food centre’s Facebook page for more information on the upcoming campaign and how you can help.

Those interested in volunteering at the food centre, in need of a food hamper, or with general questions about the food centre can call or text 403-632-6716 or email foodcentrepc@gmail.ca.

Three women, Faith Zachar with grey hair, glasses and purple sweater, Alecia Williams with long blonde hair, turquoise ball cap and blue winter coat, and Rhonda Oczkowsi with shoulder-length dark brown hair and two-tone brown shirt, hold a giant cheque

Donation helps Pincher Creek kids do sports

Representatives of the Moon Shadow Run committee presented a cheque for $1,400 to Pincher Creek’s KidSport chapter this winter.

KidSport is a charity that helps Canadian youths and their families overcome financial hurdles to becoming more active.

“I believe it’s vital to the town because we want to keep children involved in sports and recreational activities,” says Faith Zachar, a member of committees for both KidSport and the Moon Shadow Run.

“It’s important that we raise some money so that KidSport can assist kids with getting into a sport, whether it’s baseball, basketball, soccer or whatever.”

 

Ad for Ascent Dental in Pincher Creek

 

Funds were raised in September 2022 during the annual Moon Shadow Run, which has been a town tradition since 2015.

“Getting people out on our town path as a whole family, and knowing it’s supporting a great cause, is very rewarding,” says Alecia Williams, who chairs the Moon Shadow Run committee. “It’s so much fun.”

The event is a fun family run for all ages, featuring 2.5-kilometre, five-kilometre and 10-kilometre routes on gentle rolling shale trails along the creek.

Both Faith and Alecia were adamant about how important it is to them to not only help kids get active through KidSport, but to see them participate in the run as well.

 

 

“Running for me is a great, easy way to take care of my mental and physical health, so it’s important to me that kids are active in that way and reaping those benefits,” says Alecia.

The Moon Shadow Run will return to Pincher Creek in September, so if you are interested in participating, make sure to keep an eye out for details.

 

 

 

Local Stories Story Idea?

 

 

Members of Pincher Creek high school reunion committee meet around a u-shaped table

Plans underway for Pincher Creek classes of 1950-73 reunion

Pincher Creek’s multi-year high school reunion — for alumni who were part of or could have been part of graduating classes from 1950 to 1973 — is making its return this summer for the first time since 2018.

Individuals from the aforementioned years are welcome to get together with friends and fellow alumni for a weekend of fun, festivities, storytelling and activities taking place from June 30 to July 2.

“It’s both wonderful and heartwarming to see people that you’ve grown up with after so long, and interesting to see what the people that you spent so many years with have done with their lives and what they’re doing now,” says BJ Scott, one of the lead organizers.

While the majority of attendees and organizers attended Matthew Halton High School, alumni from St. Michael’s School are welcome and encouraged to participate as well.

 

Ad for Sara Hawthorn, Pincher Creek and Crowsnest Pass realtor

 

The Pincher Creek/Matthew Halton High School reunion has been taking place since 2003 and takes place every five years. The range of graduating classes expands with each edition of the reunion.

Planning began in early December, when the reunion committee convened for the first time to discuss plans, make arrangements for venues and activities, and get organized for the summer. The committee is made up of representatives from the majority of grad classes featured at the weekend festivities.

While many details remain to be ironed out, the event will be held primarily at Pincher Creek Community Hall, where alumni can look forward to sharing meals together, socializing, dancing, singing, taking in a live band and storytelling.

Additionally, a local photographer will take pictures of alumni from each graduating class to produce a reunion yearbook. 

 

 

“The reunion will be both emotional and heartfelt. It’ll be so incredible to see all of these folks back here again and socializing and talking about those days when life seemed perhaps a little simpler,” says David Green, chairman of the reunion committee and a town councillor in Pincher Creek.

“This is really an important step out from the pandemic. I mean, for many of the alumni this will be one of the first major opportunities since the last reunion to get out and socialize. It’ll be a great chance for people to cut loose.”

Further decisions and updates regarding the reunion should be made available when the committee gets together to discuss further plans for the weekend event.

The reunion committee will have reconvened as of Jan. 10, so if you are interested and eligible for the event, and wish to learn more, visit the Pincher Creek High School Alumni page on Facebook or shoot an email to the committee.

 

Pig roast at wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

 

Local Stories Obituaries Story Idea?

 

 

 

 

Black and white soccer ball in goal net

Pincher Creek Soccer Association prepares for 2023 season

The Pincher Creek Soccer Association held its annual general meeting Jan. 11 to discuss plans and organize for the 2023 soccer season, including fundraising, open board positions and coaching of the clubs.

The board of directors reviewed how they would structure practices, games and tournaments, hoping to make the most of the soccer season for the kids participating.

As of this year, minor-league-level players will compete in a weekly intersquad game. Now the players will have one practice and one game per week, with an option to join a tournament league. 

While age groupings are yet to be finalized, the association offers co-ed soccer, generally for ages four to 18. Furthermore, the association is considering including an option for a girls team ranging from grades 6 to 8.

 

Wedding banquet view of wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

“We are hoping to grow our presence in the community and encourage kids to come out and experience soccer,” says Jen Boissoneault, PCSA registrar.

“It is an inexpensive way for our kids to stay active and learn team-building skills.”

During the meeting, Tany Warkentin was made the new president of the PCSA. Tany will lead a group of devoted volunteers as they aim to make this season a spectacular one for the kids and the association that serves them.

“All coaches, managers and board members are volunteers, and we are so thankful for their willingness and contributions which make community soccer possible in Pincher Creek,” says Jen.

The PCSA is seeking out parents willing to get involved in coaching the teams. The association will host a coaching clinic at the beginning of the season for parents new to coaching. Parent coaches can register their children for soccer for free.    

 

 

There is a desire to grow the association and increase fundraising efforts within the community. Parents in particular are encouraged to keep an eye out for updates and information regarding future fundraising opportunities and how they can support the association.

For parents interested in signing their children up for soccer, there are many ways to do it. Registration begins at Ranchland Mall, where PCSA will be on-site with a registration table Feb. 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. A mass registration night will feature PCSA volunteers where parents can also sign their children up.

For the first time, the PCSA is offering online registration. The registration deadline is April 8, with no registrations accepted beyond that date. Parents who register their children before March 25 will receive an early-bird discount.

To learn more about the PCSA and the upcoming soccer season, you can send your questions to Jen at and follow PCSA’s Facebook page for further updates.

 

Indoor and outdoor view of wedding venue — the Cowley Lions Campground Stockade near Pincher Creek in southwestern Alberta.

 

 

Local Stories Obituaries Story Idea?

 

Three men, holding red solo cups, have a conversation at a charity auction

Charity Auction raises $45K for air ambulances

Real Estate Centre has raised $45,064 for STARS and HALO air ambulance services through its annual charity auction event, held Jan. 19 at Readymade Community Centre in Coaldale.

Funds were split between the two services, with 75 per cent going to STARS and 25 per cent to HALO. 

Real Estate Centre has been able to support a number of different charities through the annual event since its inception in 2014.

This year’s event was the first one in three years, due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

Ad for Dragons Heart Quilt Shop in Pincher Creek

 

“Being our first year back, we had planned for fewer attendees and fewer donations than usual. But even with those parameters in place, we still did exceptionally well,” says Heleen Jacobsen, broker, manager and co-owner of Real Estate Centre’s various locations. 

Despite providing lifesaving services, STARS and HALO receive very little in government funding and rely heavily on sponsors and donations. 

“It’s such a good cause to be fundraising for and it’s a cause that’s near and dear to my heart,” Heleen says. 

“You never know how quickly you can have something happen in your life where you need these services. We hope we never do, but it can happen just like that.”

 

 

Shayla Farough, advertising and resource co-ordinator for Real Estate Centre, echoed Heleen’s sentiments about the services.

“I grew up in a rural community. In fact, HALO would be our call if something ever happened to my family growing up, so I think it’s great that we can do our part to support these organizations,” Shayla says.

According to Heleen, her company wished to support these two services specifically because of the impact they have on the communities they serve. 

Many of the company’s offices throughout Alberta and Saskatchewan operate in small towns and rural communities — including Crowsnest Pass. These areas rely on air ambulance services in cases where people require immediate emergency medical attention.

 

 

“Sometimes, if you just take a local charity, then that only would work for that office. So we felt that this charity, of course, while near and dear to our hearts, it also affects all of our offices,” Heleen says.

Real Estate Centre conducted both silent and live auctions at the event to raise money, on top of receiving donations from many individual donors and sponsors. Some of the auctioned items went for hundreds and even thousands of dollars.

Congratulations to Real Estate Centre for the extremely successful charity auction. The money raised will go a long way in supporting these emergency services.

 

 

 

More Local Stories

 

Obituaries
Man dressed in black pants and black shirt with yellow logo, on skateboard with dark moustache and beard and grey hat

Donations bring Crowsnest skatepark a step closer to reality

The Southwest Alberta Skateboard Society, composed of volunteers dedicated to promoting the growth of skateboarding in the southwest, has ramped up its efforts to have a new outdoor skatepark designed and built in Crowsnest Pass.

On Jan. 29, 2019, the Municipality of Crowsnest Pass made the difficult decision to abruptly close the Albert Stella Memorial Arena, the site of the old indoor skatepark that was widely popular with the Pass skateboarding community. 

The decision came after an engineering consultant retained by council submitted a structural analysis, citing numerous damages and deficiencies.

That same day, council announced in a press release that, after reviewing the report, the building was deemed unsafe and it was in the municipality’s best interests to close the arena to ensure the safety of staff and residents.

 

 

Prior to the closure, Crowsnest Pass had a thriving skateboard community that occupied the indoor skatepark on any given day. When the arena was unexpectedly closed, it meant this community had to travel to neighbouring towns to skateboard at their parks.

“There’s a lot of really good skateboarders in the Pass that need a local place to skateboard,” says Ian Gauthier, secretary and treasurer for SWASS and co-owner of Boarderline Skate Shop in Lethbridge.

“When it shut down, we started to regroup and refocus our energy on trying to do a big push to get an outdoor skateboard park.”

Since the fall of 2021, after initial delays resulting from the inability to meet during the Covid pandemic, Ian and his fellow volunteers have proceeded to get the outdoor skatepark project back on track. 

 

 

This past year saw the group really up their efforts, hosting and attending various events and fundraising for the project. On top of their own fundraising efforts, SWASS has received support from the community as well.

Working with the municipality, SWASS was able to get approval on a future location, in Flumerfelt Park in Coleman, for the skatepark.

“We’re in a good spot with the community involvement. The city’s on board and the recreation department are as well, and we just want to push forward,” says Ian.

In December, after months of planning and preparation, SWASS and Pass Beer Co. announced the release of a new beer called the Pop Shuvit Pilsner, where a percentage of all sales would go towards the new skatepark.  

 

 

Shortly after the release of the new beer, the Blairmore Lions club generously donated $10,000 to SWASS for the Crowsnest Pass skateboard park project. 

The money raised by Pass Beer and the Lions club, along with the location approval, are huge stepping stones for SWASS as it moves forward with its plans.

“We’re in the process of raising money for Phase 1, which is raising enough money to get the full design budget done up by a reputable skateboard company, skatepark builder, and then from there, we can then apply for all the grants and kind of move forward with the city in getting it done,” says Ian.

Ultimately, SWASS is pushing to get a new park built with the kids of Crowsnest Pass in mind, even if it is a long and expensive undertaking.

 

 

Group of people gathered in a pub with pizza on the table. In back, a man in a red shirt and another in a hat and grey shirt exchange a cheque. Two people in front hold a sign reading Boarderline.

Members of the Southwest Alberta Skateboard Society accept a donation of $10,000 from the Blairmore Lions Club. The money will go toward building a new outdoor skatepark in Crowsnest Pass.
Photo courtesy of Southwest Alberta Skateboard Society
Click image to enlarge

 

“It’s not going to happen overnight. It typically takes years to fundraise the money required for a quality-design skatepark done by a professional company,” says Ron MacGarva, president of SWASS.

“With that said, though, it’s all about the kids. Everybody knows that kids need places and opportunities to step out and be physically active, and skateboarding is a great way of doing that.”

The group aims to meet at the end of the month to discuss further plans to fundraise, skatepark designs, and selection of the company that will assist with designs and budget.

If you wish to stay up to date and learn more about the efforts to bring a skateboard park back to Crowsnest Pass, or are interested in volunteering, you can find SWASS on Facebook or Instagram.

The club is accepting donations for the skatepark, which can be e-transferred to SWASS  here.

 

 

Man dressed in black pants and black shirt with yellow logo, on skateboard with dark moustache and beard and grey hat

Skater Brendan MacArthur attempts a backside disaster trick at Banff Skatepark.
Photo by Cameron Stephens
Click image To enlarge

 

 

More Local Stories

 

Obituaries

 

 

 

 

 

Circle with profile of William Cockerell, male wearing sunglasses and black shirt, with dark moustache, beard and long hair blowing in the wind.

 

Smiling and laughing kids faces in a circle

Minions coming to Pincher Creek

This Saturday, Feb. 18, with Family Day just around the corner, Fox Theatre in Pincher Creek is hosting its inaugural Family Day Festival.

Intended to be a fun event for children and parents alike, the festival will feature a silent auction, a poster sale, free prize draws, food and a wide range of activities including cookie decorating, crafts, face painting, a glow dance party, a movie and a meet-and-greet with a Minion from the Despicable Me movie franchise.

Families will also have a chance to win a free movie party, valued at $250.

 

 

Entry for the festival, running 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., is $10 per family, making it an affordable outing that will provide hours of fun and activities.

“We have kids of our own, so we just decided that we should try this Family Day Festival and have something for kids and parents to do that could be fun for everybody,” says Amanda Leaming, co-owner of Fox Theatre.

Amanda and her partner, Obah Tawo, purchased the theatre in October 2022 and view the festival as an exciting opportunity to immerse themselves in the community. The pair will be at the event to meet locals and answer questions people may have for them.

 

 

“We felt like doing a Family Day Festival would kind of help tie us into the community and get more people out,” says Amanda.

“We’re from a small community, and I grew up in Turner Valley, so small communities are what we’re used to and what we’re comfortable with.”

Money raised at the event will go toward upkeep of the theatre as the owners look to enhance the facility.

Follow Fox Theatre’s Facebook page for updates on exciting upcoming events and projects.

 

 

 

More Local Stories

 

 

More Local Stories

 

 

Front page of Feb. 8, 2023 issue of Shootin' the Breeze newspaper. Many people, wearing coloured hockey jerseys, walk on a cold winter morning

Feb. 8, 2023 E-Edition

Winter walk with memories of Wayne

Clad in hockey jerseys, locals gathered Feb. 1 for Pincher Creek’s annual Winter Walk Day, with the late Wayne Elliott in the thoughts of many.

 

Hands holding a stop watch in front of a racetrack with numbered lanes

Passtrak competes at first track-and-field meet of 2023

Thirteen Passtrak members successfully competed in their first track-and-field meet of the year Jan. 8 in Calgary.

Many competitors put up personal bests and top-three performances racing in their respective groups, ranging from U10 boys to the 40-44 master division.

In his first official meet, Finnley Hay was the lone U10 competitor racing for Passtrak. The young athlete competed in the 60-metre, 150-metre and 300-metre races, placing third in each.

Representing the club in the 10-year-old girls category was Norah Smith, who competed in three races and reached the podium each time. This included a 60-metre race where she achieved a personal best time en route to a first-place finish.

 

 

The 11-year-old boys division featured two representatives of Passtrak in Declan Sutherland and Aiden Aasen.

Declan put on a dominant showcase, taking first in the 60-metre and 300-metre races while additionally posting a Passtrak record time in the 1,200-metre race, placing second.

Aiden placed second in both the 150-metre and 300-metre races, and first in the 1,200, setting a club record at four minutes 29.56 seconds.

The club’s 12-year-old competitors were Cammy Hays in the girls division and Jasper Smith in the boys division.

Cammy competed in the 60-metre, 150-metre and 400-metre races. She placed seventh, ninth and sixth, respectively. Her time of 25.47 seconds in the 150 was a new personal best.

Jasper achieved new best times in the 150-metre race, where he placed seventh, and in the 400, where he placed fourth. He placed second in the 1,200-metre race, clocking in at 5:06.96, while demolishing the previous Passtrak record in his age bracket.

 

 

Ella Peebles and Eli Bailey were the club’s 13-year-old representatives. 

Ella competed in three races in the girls division, achieving career highs in all three. She placed eighth in the 60-metre race and seventh in both the 150- and 400-metre races. 

Eli registered multiple career-high times in the 13-year-old boys 60- and 150-metre races, placing third and fourth. Additionally, Eli came in third place in the 400.

Cohen Folkard, Colton Sutherland and Carson Hay represented Passtrak in the 14-year-old boys division in three races a piece. 

The trio dominated in the 60-metre hurdles race, sweeping the podium as Cohen, Colton and Carson placed first, second and third, respectively. 

Cohen and Carson proceeded to take part in the 400-metre race, placing second and fourth while both establishing new bests. 

Carson placed ninth in the 150-metre race while posting a new best time. 

The trio reunited for the 1,200-metre race, as Cohen placed second, Colton placed fourth and Carson placed sixth.

 

 

Longtime Passtrak athlete Jack Bailey raced in the under-20 division, participating in the 60-metre hurdles and 600-metre race. Jack was disqualified from the 60-metre hurdles for a rule infraction, but would put up a new personal-best time during the 600 for a sixth-place finish.

Craig Hay raced twice in the 40-to-44-year-old masters division. Competing in 300- and 1,500-metre races, Craig placed second and set club records in both events.

The day ended with a second-place finish in the four-by-200-metre relay race. The team consisted of Eli, Aiden, Jasper and Declan.

Congratulations to Passtrak’s athletes on these hard-fought results and achievements.

Passtrak is a competitive track-and-field club operating out of Crowsnest Pass for area athletes aged nine and over. In its 20th year of operation, the organization is a member of Athletics Alberta as well as Athletics Canada.

 

 

More Local Stories

 

Obituaries

 

 

 

 

Circle with profile of William Cockerell, male with dark moustache, beard and long hair blowing in the wind