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Author: Breeze Content

Entertainer Fred Penner high fives with a child in the audience at Pincher Creek's Lebel Mansion

Shootin’ the Breeze – August 23, 2023

Pincher Creek parties with Penner

They laughed, they sang, they danced and, most importantly, they had a good time. Children, parents and grandparents alike packed the rose garden lawn at Lebel Mansion last Wednesday for A Summer Night With Fred Penner. During the free concert, hosted by the Pincher Creek Allied Arts Council, four-time Juno Award winner Fred Penner performed a multitude of his timeless classics to an adoring crowd.  

Blank front page of newspaper. Does news matter to you?

Shootin’ the Breeze – August 16, 2023

Is local news important to you?

Meta says it isn’t so.

“The world is constantly changing and publishers, like everyone else, have

to adapt. Asking a social media company in 2023 to subsidize news

publishers for content that isn’t important to our users is like asking

email providers to pay the postal service because people don’t send

letters any more.”        bit.ly/459s5Kv

Young Indigenous boy wearing a buffalo cap with horns and sitting on a white and brown pony with blue eyes.

Shootin’ the Breeze – August 9, 2023

Game face on!

Piikani Nation held its 64th annual powwow and celebration over the August long weekend, embracing Niitsitapii culture and Blackfoot heritage. The weekend’s events included traditional powwow dancing, warrior relay races, a youth rodeo, markets and more. Pictured is a Piikani youth warrior relay jockey, preparing himself for the race. Watch for more photos in next week’s issue.

Young Indigenous girl in glasses and cowboy hat and shirt reading Little Miss Sunshine rides a brown horse

Shootin’ the Breeze – July 26, 2023

Ready to Rodeo!

Little miss sunshine Allison Red Young Man grins ear to ear as she learns to ride horses with the Piikani Youth Rodeo Club. The club met every Monday and Wednesday in July to encourage kids to get on a horse. Decked out in sunflower western wear, this little cowgirl is ready to roll for the upcoming Piikani Youth Rodeo.

Logo for RCMP online crime reporting website

RCMP encourage online reporting of crime

Since August 2020, Alberta RCMP have offered online reporting for theft and vandalism. While traditional in-person or telephone reporting is still an option, online reporting is a convenient way for people to contact police and get them involved faster.

“From the standpoint of property crime, say like stolen bicycles or items out of a yard, it speeds up the process for the individual reporting it,” says Cpl. Marty Reed of the Pincher Creek detachment.

“Officers often get tied up on other matters, so it can take several hours to a day or two to even respond to the call.”

Online reporting is available 24-7, though it is offered only for items under $5,000 that have been lost or stolen. Victims of vandalism can also submit a report if the cost to repair the damage is less than $5,000. Thefts over $5,000 can be reported only by oil, telecommunications and utility companies.

The online system will only process crimes that were committed within the jurisdiction of Alberta RCMP. Additionally, crimes involving a witness or suspect cannot be reported online, along with thefts involving personal identity, firearms, licence plates or decals.

All online reports will be followed up with a phone call from a police officer within five business days.

Although online reporting is offered only for smaller theft and vandalism crimes, reports submitted to the RCMP online will be investigated the same as any other crime reported any other way. The reports also help police identify where they are needed and provide information that can guide future patrols.

To avoid duplicate files, only victims are able to report crime online. Although there isn’t a way to track a report once submitted, individuals can follow up with their report by calling 1-855-565-7555 or emailing kocr-selc-information@rcmp-grc.gc.ca and providing the reference number they received when they submitted their online report.

Online reports can be made here.

RCMP logo over red and blue lights noting that a missing couple has been found deceased near Crowsnest Pass

Foul play not suspected in deaths of missing couple

One day after Red Deer RCMP requested public assistance to locate Beverly Lampert and Richard Vanderbroek, police advised that the couple had been located deceased.

This followed a statement made June 30 by the Red Deer RCMP requesting public assistance locating the couple, last seen June 21.

Lampert, 63, and Vanderbroek, 82, were believed to be travelling to Cranbrook, B.C. 

Concern for their well-being was raised after the couple were not heard from after an expected return date of June 25.

They were located deceased July 1 near Highway 22 in the Crowsnest Pass area north of Lundbreck. An autopsy July 4 suggested no foul play, police said, but their deaths remain under investigation. 

Southern Alberta RCMP’s major crimes unit has been leading the investigation, with a media release noting assistance from Red Deer and Crowsnest Pass RCMP.

Young boy in yellow shirt smiles broadly as he holds up two 10-inch ponytails the woman behind him has just cut off for him to donate for kid's cancer wigs.

Shootin’ the Breeze – June 14, 2023

Rylan shares his locks with Wigs for Kids B.C. 

Rylan Williams is donating 10 inches of hair to Wigs for Kids B.C., a group providing free wigs to children dealing with life-threatening illnesses, and has raised more than $3,700 for the Alberta Children’s Hospital.

Four young male football players from the Pincher Creek Mustangs stand with a male coach.

Shootin’ the Breeze – May 17, 2023

Mustang might

Pincher Creek Mustangs players Owen Olsen, Ben Poloni, Beau Rector-Hunink and Will Schoening played on the winning team at the U15 bantam all-star game in Lethbridge on May 7 where the White Knights came away with an 18-14 win.

Create wedding ambiance with flowers

Nicki Schoening, owner of C&D Floral in Pincher Creek, loves a good bouquet challenge.

On your wedding day, the flowers should be there for you, but Nicki notes that flexibility is often crucial when seeking out your dream bouquet.

“When you look at pictures on the internet, the shades of flowers that you’re gonna see, the combination of fresh flowers and silk flowers, the availability of flowers in the area where you’re getting married might all change in real life as opposed to what you see on the internet,” says Nicki.

She explains that one thing to consider in picking your flowers is your dress style, such as pairing elegant dresses with elegant flowers, country style with country style or trailing with trailing.

Popularity and trends can be other interesting aspects of choosing your bouquet.

“There are different things that have come and gone in fashion in the time that I’ve been doing this,” says Nicki. She notes that eucalyptus and trailing flowers have been very popular in recent weddings.

 

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Beautiful sampling of wedding invitations and photo cards created by Claresholm Local Press.

 

When it comes to floral decor, it is important to consider the place and the weather conditions if you’re outside.

“You have to take the wind into account, because it’s going to make a difference,” says Nicki.

“It’s almost impossible to do tall vase arrangements outside without it blowing over, so you need to think about maybe a lower, broader style of container if you’re putting arrangements outside. Make sure that you’ve got a place where they can be firmly attached if you’re putting them onto an archway or something like that.”

“Challenge us,” says Nicki. “We’re always looking for a fresh challenge. We’ve done a lot of wedding flowers over the years of all different sizes, colours, styles, price points. We love challenge!”

C&D floral is here for you and your wedding for anything flower-related.

 

Guide for local brides

 

 

Outdoor wedding considerations

From a picture-perfect view to the relaxed atmosphere, there are plenty of reasons to have your wedding outside. However, you’ll need to take particular care when choosing your dress, shoes and hairstyle to ensure you look and feel your best. Here are some things to consider.

The ground

If you’ll be walking on grass or sand during the wedding ce­­­remony, stilettos are out of the question. For comfort and balance, choose shoes with a wide heel, or better yet, an elegant pair of ballerina flats.

The wind

A long veil, flowing skirt and loosely pinned-back hair can quickly get out of hand on a gusty day. Consider a birdcage veil and opt for a secure up­do style with beautiful pins to hold your hair in place.

The temperature

For a summer wedding, sandals and a strapless or sleeveless dress are the way to go. Consider a matching jacket or shawl in case it gets cool in the evening. For a fall ceremony, opt for long sleeves and booties.

 

 

Southwestern Alberta is a beautiful place to have your outdoor wedding, and many local venues are ready to accommodate your special day.

Castle Mountain Resort, Crowsnest Mountain Weddings, Heritage Acres and Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village all offer unique wedding packages that allow couples to celebrate their union while celebrating nature and the local scenery.

At Castle Mountain Resort, wedding goers can venture into the backcountry to exchange vows in the heart of nature.

Crowsnest Mountain Weddings uses SpringBreak Flower Farm as its venue. After the garden centre shuts down for the season, an outdoor area is provided for ceremonies and the greenhouse becomes the perfect place to enjoy a beautiful event while protected from the elements.

Heritage Acres is complete with beautiful grounds and heritage barns and buildings that can be rented for ceremony and reception. 

Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village offers a gorgeous outdoor space for larger gatherings and rustic antique buildings for smaller gatherings.

The nice thing about outdoor weddings is the scenery itself is part of the decor.

As you plan your outdoor wedding, keep trusted local business in mind!

 

Guide for local brides

 

 

Things to do before saying ‘I do’

Use this month-by-month checklist to make sure you don’t forget a thing.

12 months before

  • Decide on the type of wedding you’d like (civil or religious, big or small)
  • Choose a date
  • Determine the number of guests
  • Establish a budget
  • Pick venues for the ceremony and reception (it’s best to reserve early)

11 months before

  • Make your guest list
  • Choose a caterer (meet with a few first)
  • Select your wedding party
  • Hire a wedding planner

10 months before

  • Start shopping for a wedding dress
  • Decide on a theme for your wedding
  • Choose an officiant if you haven’t already done so

 

9 months before

  • Book a photographer
  • Reserve a block of hotel rooms for your out-of-town guests
  • Purchase a wedding gown
  • Shop for the groom’s attire and purchase it

8 months before

  • Meet with your officiant to plan your ceremony
  • Book your entertainment (DJ, band, MC, etc.)
  • Shop for and purchase your bridesmaids’ dresses
  • Design and order the wedding invitations and save-the-date cards

7 months before

  • Create a gift registry
  • Hire a florist
  • Plan your honeymoon

 

6 months before

  • Send out the save-the-date cards
  • Book your hair and makeup appointments for the day of (and trial runs for both)
  • Book a hotel room for the wedding night if necessary

5 months before

  • Create a schedule for the big day
  • Decide on dates for bachelor and bachelorette parties
  • Shop for and purchase shoes, jewelry and accessories

4 months before

  • Reserve wedding day transportation for the wedding party
  • Select alcohol and other drinks for the reception
  • Taste and choose your wedding cake
  • Buy wedding bands
  • Shop for and order the groomsmen’s attire

 

3 months before

  • Purchase wedding favours for your guests
  • If you’d like a loved one to say or read something during the ceremony, let them know
  • Write down your vows
  • Decide on activities for the reception (photo booth, dancing, games, etc.)

2 months before

  • Send out your wedding invitations
  • Do trial runs for both hair and makeup
  • Give your music selections to the DJ or MC

1 month before

  • Finalize the schedule for the big day
  • Choose a seating plan for the reception
  • Break in your shoes

 

1 week before

  • Visit the desired beauty professionals (hair colourist, esthetician, etc.)
  • Practise reading your vows
  • Write out cheques to pay your vendors

1 day before

  • Get your nails done
  • Give the cheques to someone you trust to pay the vendors

Day of, Enjoy!

brown haired man with moustache and goatee speaks into a microphone

Pincher Creek RCMP look to summer staffing in Waterton

Speaking to town council March 27, Hodge assured Mayor Don Anderberg that he’d notify town hall if the detachment anticipated a staffing crunch. 

“If officers don’t come in from out-of-area, the [Pincher Creek] detachment would have to fill in,” Hodge said, qualifying that it was too soon to tell. 

The detachment typically aims to post two Mounties in Waterton Park at all times throughout the summer. Six Mounties were cycled through in pairs last summer, with the detachment occasionally filling in.

“There were definitely periods where we had to supplement [coverage in Waterton] with our own officers, but that was kept to a very minimum level,” Hodge told council. 

It’s not hard to attract Mounties who are willing to spend a summer in the park. The challenge, Hodge explained, is freeing up Mounties from their home detachments. 

 

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Poster promoting Pavlo concert at Empress Theatre in Fort Macleod

 

“Provincewide, we’re finding that resource levels are low and it’s tough to get officers released so that they can come down and work for us.”

Mounties from Fort Vermilion and High Prairie have already expressed interest in policing Waterton this summer, according to Hodge. At the same time, the detachment commander said he was in talks with Cardston RCMP about potentially pooling resources. 

In the meantime, Hodge said, the detachment was “definitely feeling an impact” in the absence of the town’s former peace officers. 

Mounties are being called to respond to complaints about dogs, many of which fall outside the scope of police work.

“We’ll always respond to dog attacks, but we don’t deal with stray dogs or complaints about dogs chasing deer through town. Our officers don’t have the training or the time for that,” Hodge advised council. 

“We’re in the process of filling positions for two bylaw officers,” Mayor Anderberg replied. “We don’t have anyone in place right now, but that’s in the works.”